Liquid Diving Adventures

Latest News & Updates

Calipso Galapagos Liveaboard - Last Minute - Save $1400

Calipso Galapagos Liveaboard

Last Minute - Save $1400

November 18-25, 2021

Now $4295


Take advantage of our super deal now and save $1400 and FREE nitrox.

All ensuite double cabins can be converted to 1 bed. Cabins have individual climate control, TV, safety deposit box, storage, hairdryer, and windows. The dive deck has a rinse tank, a large camera table, a dry charging area, hot showers, individual dive stations with storage, wetsuit racks, and a bathroom.

   


   

Garden Island Resort - Fiji

Garden Island Resort - Fiji

Fiji is reopening for international travelers..!

   

We have two packages:
7 Nights / 5 Dive Day $1541 USD PPDO
10 Nights / 7 Dive Days $1848 USD PPDO

Must book by June 30, 2022 for travel valid through December 31, 2022.

Packages include:
  • Round trip airport transfers to/from Matei Airport
  • Oceanview Suite accommodations
  • Meal Plan with Breakfast, 2-course Lunch, 3-course Dinner
  • 2-Tank boat dives, unlimited shore dives during shop hours
  • Add Nitrox - $168 for 10 tanks
  • Non-diver discount - $500 off 7 night package, $650 off 10 night package
  • Free room upgrade to Oceanfront Suite if available

        


   

Atlantis Azores Liveaboard DEMA 2021 Specials

Atlantis Azores Liveaboard 

DEMA 2021 Specials

The Philippines will be opening their borders and welcoming international visitors!

Let's Scuba...!


Book a trip on the Atlantis Azores liveaboard by Dec 15, 2021 for travel through December 31, 2024.

* * Limited Availability - Contact Us with Your Travel Dates * * 

We are offering two different itineraries:
Malapascu - Cebu for 9 nights  $3495 PPDO - Ask for Agent Discount
Bohol for 7 nights  $2995 PPDO - Ask for Agent Discount

Malapascua - Cebu Itinerary

Our exciting Malapascua – Cebu charter offers some of the best diving in the Philippines, including Sumilon Island, Pescador Island & Malapascua’s Gato Island, home of a sea crate protected breeding sanctuary. This charter includes another Malapascua favorite, Monad Shoal, known for frequent sightings of thresher sharks as well as manta rays. In addition to these pelagic species, the Malapascua area offers a wide variety of critter diving not to mention abundant reefs and wall diving. Leaving Malapascua, we head to Calanggaman Island, one of Philippines most beautiful islands. Next we head to Bohol for again a wide variety of reef, wall & critter diving as well as some land tour opportunities for those so inclined. As a Grand Finale we finish the itinerary on the dramatic walls of Balicasag, one of our favorite dives. This itinerary is hard to beat if you want a wide variety of locations as well as incredible diving.


Bohol Itinerary

The Visayas are one of the three island groups in the Philippines; enjoy six fabulous days diving from the Atlantis Azores around one of the most beautiful and bio-diverse regions in Asia. Easy cruises each evening will take you from one great dive site to another. With easy transfers, consider a combo trip with Atlantis Dumaguete for a multiple-week first-class dive vacation at a very reasonable investment.

    

    

The Arenui Liveaboard - Ready to Sail Post-COVID

The Arenui Liveaboard

Ready to Sail Post-COVID

Limited Berths Available for 2022, 2023, 2024

If you have always wanted to join a charter on the fabulous Arenui, now is your chance of a lifetime. There are limited berths available from 2021 our to 2025 and we have listed a few. The rates are different for each charter. Contact us for Agent rates on these charters.

2022 Rates: 8N, $5360; 9N $6030; 11N $7370

2023 Rates:10N $6700; 11N $7370; 12N $8040

2024 Rates: 9N $6120; 11N $7480; 13N $8840


ALOR
This hidden gem is unbeknown to some of even the keenest of divers. It is a rapidly up and coming destination and it’s not difficult to see why. Not only does Alor host the world’s best Rhinophia dive site but it is the only clear water critter Mecca in Indonesia. The magical anemone covered site of ‘Anemone City’ and pristine coral reefs gives divers the feeling they are part of a Disney movie. 

  • KOMODO-ALOR | 05-Jul-22 ~ 16-Jul-22 | 11 nights | 1 single bed available (female) $7370 USD
  • ALOR-KOMODO | 04-May-23 ~ 15-May-23 | 11 nights | 2 single beds available ( female and male)
  • ALOR | 26-Jul-23 ~ 02-Aug-23 | 7 nights | 6 cabins available
  • KOMODO-ALOR | 03-Sep-23 ~ 14-Sep-23 | 11 nights | 2 cabins available
  • ALOR-KOMODO | 02-May-24 ~ 13-May-24 | 11 nights | 6 cabins available
  • KOMODO-ALOR | 22-Jul-24 ~ 02-Aug-24 | 11 nights | 6 cabins available
  • ALOR | 04-Aug-24 ~ 13-Aug-24 | 9 nights | 7 cabins available $6160 USD
  • ALOR | 15-Aug-24 ~ 24-Aug-24 | 9 nights | 7 cabins available $6160 USD

KOMODO
Komodo is now one of the new 7 Wonders of Nature! This National Park is located in the coral triangle and has some of the best diving in the world! It has some of the most diverse dive sites ranging from macro subjects to pelagics. Love critters? There are pygmy seahorses, ornate ghost pipefish, blue-ringed octopus, nudibranchs, crabs and more. Want schooling fish, soft corals, hard corals and some of the most colorful reefs you will ever see? You've got it all on this cruise!

  • KOMODO-ALOR | 05-Jul-22 ~ 16-Jul-22 | 11 nights | 1 single bed available (female) $7370 USD
  • ALOR-KOMODO | 04-May-23 ~ 15-May-23 | 11 nights | 2 single beds available ( female and male)
  • KOMODO-ALOR | 03-Sep-23 ~ 14-Sep-23 | 11 nights | 2 cabins available
  • ALOR-KOMODO | 02-May-24 ~ 13-May-24 | 11 nights | 6 cabins available
  • KOMODO FOCUS | 15-May-24 ~ 23-May-24 | 8 nights | 7 cabins available
  • KOMODO-SUMBAWA | 25-May-24 ~ 02-Jun-24 | 8 nights | 6 cabins available
  • KOMODO-ALOR | 22-Jul-24 ~ 02-Aug-24 | 11 nights | 6 cabins available 

RAJA AMPAT & TRITON BAY

Raja Ampat in the heart of the Coral Triangle, offers the most striking biodiversity on the planet! With over 1,000 islands the landscape, as well as the diving, is a photographer’s paradise. Diving here comes with a warning...the vibrant colors and unbelievable sea life in the near-perfect diving conditions will spoil you for life! 

  • GREATER RAJA AMPAT | 22-Dec-21 ~ 04-Jan-22 | 13 nights | 1 single bed available (female)
  • RAJA AMPAT | 26-Nov-22 ~ 07-Dec-22 | 11 nights | 1 single bed available (male) $7370 USD
  • MALUKU-BANDA-RAJA AMPAT | 26-Mar-23 ~ 07-Apr-23 | 12 nights | 1 single bed available (male)
  • RAJA AMPAT-TRITON BAY | 09-Dec-23 ~ 20-Dec-23 | 11 nights | 1 cabin available
  • RAJA AMPAT | 22-Dec-23 ~ 02-Jan-24 | 11 nights | 1 single bed available (female)
  • RAJA AMPAT | 04-Jan-24 ~ 15-Jan-24 | 11 nights | 1 single bed available (male)
  • RAJA AMPAT | 07-Dec-24 ~ 18-Dec-24 | 11 nights | 7 cabins available
   


     

Volivoli Resort Fiji - 2021 DEMA Deals

Volivoli Resort Fiji

2021 DEMA Deals


Volivoli 7-Night Package

Must book October 1 to December 17, 2021
Travel Dates thru March 31, 2024

*  * Discount Fares on Fiji Airways Available  * *

$2256 Per Person Double Occupancy

  • 7 Night Diver Package Inclusions

    • ●  Round trip Nadi International Airport/resort transfers

    • ●  7 nights’ accommodation Ocean View room

    • ●  Welcome drink on arrival

    • ●  Full meal plan – 3 meals daily with juice, milk, rain water, coffee and tea at breakfast

    • ●  3 days x 2 tank diving and 2 days x 3 tank boat diving (2 x FOC dives = 12 dives total)

    • ●  Unlimited shore diving on our 3 House Reefs

    • ●  Beach BBQ

    • ●  Traditional Meke performance and Fijian Lovo night

    • ●  Free use of kayaks, stand-up paddle boards and a variety of complimentary activities

                      Click Here -->  BOOK NOW  <--Click Here

    

    

News from Manta Ray Bay Resort - Wishing on a Star

News from Manta Ray Bay Resort

Wishing on a Star

Greetings from Bill at Manta Ray Bay Resort on Yap, 

Hope all is well with you, your family, friends, and dive buddies. As for conquering the Covid-19 pandemic, the US is heading in the right direction, Europe seems to be getting things under control as well, while here on Yap we have about 40% of the population fully vaccinated. FSM president has set a 70% vaccination rate before stranded FSM citizens would be repatriated, however last week the first batch of stranded citizens were repatriated to Pohnpei. Although this by itself is a good sign, we do not anticipate reopening until early 2022.
 
With that knowledge I must announce that that MantaFest 2021 program is officially canceled. There is no way, in my opinion, that both the FSM Government and the Yap State Government are going to agree to open the borders anytime soon and even if they open, there will undoubtedly be all sorts of restrictions placed on arrivals that no one can affectively come for a vacation. 

This breaks my heart as I miss everyone, and I miss the diving. Who could ever believe that I have been unable to travel and there is no end in sight? It is an extraordinary situation that I am still not used to. Every morning, instead of going to the resort and diving with our friends from all around the world, I am checking the news hoping that the end of the tunnel will be insight soon. There is light, but no green light yet and that is very frustrating. I’m very sorry having to email this message, but it wouldn’t be responsible and fair towards you to give you hope that we could all be together for MantaFest this year. Even the changed dates in October are just not realistic anymore. It is sad but that is the reality we are forced to deal with.
 
Please keep following my blog. I hope you are enjoying reading the updates from our beautiful island as I certainly enjoy updating you. I am very much looking forward to the day I write the blog with the headline “Yes, we’re open again”.

Although our reopening date is unknown, please have a look at our “Grand Re-opening Specials”. As a MantaFest participant in 2022, you can benefit from our “Get 3 Extra Nights for Free” offer when booking our 7, 11 or 14-night MantaFest package.
 
Finally, please help us spread the word that Manta Ray Bay Resort & Yap Divers IS the dive resort to visit once things are back to normal again. Cast your vote in the Scuba Diving magazine’s World's Best Diving Resorts & Liveaboards Reader's Awards by following this link 
 
Friends, adopted family and buddies, please stay safe and healthy! My family and I, as well as our staff, cannot wait to have you as our guests again. 
 
All the best,
 
Bill, family & staff


                                                                                    

The Normalization of Deviance (aka “Short Cut Mentality”) - Dan Orr

The Normalization of Deviance (aka “Short Cut Mentality”)

Dan Orr / Dan Orr Consulting

Originally Published in the Scuba News

https://www.thescubanews.com/2021/06/09/the-normalization-of-deviance-aka-short-cut-mentality/#prettyPhoto


I had the opportunity to listen to the live broadcast of the meeting of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) where they discussed the results of their investigation into the tragic fire aboard the dive boat, Conception, where 34 divers lost their lives. During the meeting’s 4+ hours of discussion, they reviewed all aspects of the incident as they were preparing their final report and recommendations. There were several issues identified as board members and committee heads discussed details, some very hard to listen to, of things that contributed to the catastrophic loss of life. 



Of all the things that were discussed, “normalization of deviance” struck a chord with me. I saw that it had direct application to diving safety leading me to the creation of this article. Normalization of deviance means that people become so accustomed to a conscious deviation from a standard procedure that they no longer consider those changes as being deviant.  

During my nearly 50 years as a diving professional and 23 years working at Divers Alert Network (DAN), I have read and reviewed many diving accident reports involving divers from all over the diving world. Understanding what turned an enjoyable recreational dive into a tragedy is an important step in learning how to avoid the same fate. To quote Eleanor Roosevelt, “Learn from the mistakes of others. You can’t live long enough to make them all yourself.” Many case reports detail a series of actions and habitual behaviors, which appear so far beyond comprehension that they defy our definition of “diver error.”

 

In 2008, Dr. Petar Denoble at DAN, reviewed nearly 1,000 diver fatalities. Part of his research identified triggering events that initiated a cascade of circumstances that transformed an otherwise enjoyable dive into a fatality were listed (Denoble, P., et al, “Causes of Recreational Diving Fatalities” UHM 2008, Vol. 35, No.6). Those triggering events were:

  • Out of Breathing Gas              41%
  • Entrapment                             21%
  • Equipment Problems             15%
  • Rough Water                            10%
  • Trauma                                      6%
  • Buoyancy                                  4%
  • Inappropriate Gas                     3%

Looking at this data, you can see that over 60% of the identified triggering events (Out of Breathing Gas, Equipment Problems, Buoyancy and Inappropriate Gas) were either directly or indirectly related to equipment preparation and use. Before going any further, let me comment on one of the triggering events, “Equipment Problems.” From my experience and the review of the circumstances surrounding diving fatalities, I believe that “Equipment Problems”. is more likely to be “Problems with Equipment.” In other words, user error rather than a flaw in the equipment design. Using a checklist and a consistent pre-dive ritual can increase the likelihood of identifying and correcting errors before diving. The problem seems to be that divers, even some with extensive diving experience, may decide to take short cuts or deviate from standard safety procedures due to some sense of time pressure, complacency or just feeling that standard procedures may not apply to them.  


DAN’s Annual Diving Report has interesting data regarding experience levels for diving fatalities. One graph (below) shows the number of openwater dives a diver has done within the 12 months preceding a diving fatality. In the graph below, you will see two distinct spikes in the number of fatalities. One spike involves divers with fewer than 20 openwater dives. This spike in the number of fatalities might be explained by the fact that these divers have limited experience in openwater diving, and their skills may not be sufficient to appropriately deal with a crisis underwater. Another spike in the same graph shows an increased number of fatalities with divers that have made more than 300 openwater dives in the months preceding a diving fatality. It may seem incredulous that divers with that much recent experience would get themselves in a situation where something occurred that initiated a series of events from which they could not recover. 



One possible explanation for a high number of fatalities among very experienced divers could be that they may have routinely deviated from standard safety procedures so frequently that these deviations became “normalized” because in all previous instances nothing occurred reinforcing the use of these shortcuts. Even then, the question that should come to mind is how can trained, equipped, and experienced divers, with more than 300 individual diving experiences in the 12 months preceding their death in a diving accident, get themselves into a situation where their skills, abilities and equipment were not sufficient for them to survive an underwater diving emergency. 

                                                                                                                                           

Reading through the details of many of these “accidents” found in the annual DAN Diving Accident Reports, causes you to naturally reflect on your own diving experiences and makes you realize that this could happen to you, just as it has happened to a number of highly trained, experienced and apparently qualified divers.


Clearly any of the divers found in the DAN annual Diving Reports were fully capable of following proper diving procedures and had done so on many previous openwater dives. When giving seminars on diver safety, one concept that is always brought up is “complacency” as one possible contributing factor in diving accidents. This is certainly true in many cases, but there may be another explanation, “normalization of deviance.” Normalization of deviance, in this case, means that certified and qualified scuba divers may have become so accustomed to a conscious deviation from standard diving and safety procedures that they no longer consider them as being a departure from the norm. Divers grow more accustomed to the deviation from standard procedures the more frequently they use them. To others, the deviation from a standard procedure would be seen as incorrect but to the diver, and possibly even others they regularly dive with, the incorrect procedure might seem like a normal part of the diver’s diving skills. When a deviation is made and the outcome is successful without any negative consequences, it subliminally reinforces the use of that deviation. In other words, the diver may experience a subconscious reward for doing the wrong thing because it worked.  


The term “normalization of deviance” was coined by sociologist and Columbia University professor Dr. Diane Vaughn in her book, The Challenger Launch Decision. She detailed the decisions made by NASA that led to the Space Shuttle Challenger explosion in 1986. There had been problems with the “O” rings in the solid rocket boosters on previous launches without incident. Therefore, it became “normal operating procedure” to make launch “Go” decisions with identified issues with the “O” rings. NASA, unfortunately, did not learn from the Challenger disaster and fell victim to it again when the Space Shuttle Columbia disintegrated when the heat shield failed upon re-entry in 2003. Apparently, there had been heat shield issues during previous re-entries without serious incident, again, leading to issues with the heat shield being considered within “normal” operating parameters. 


In order to learn from these space flight tragedies and other, more recent, catastrophic incidents within the diving world, we should fully understand the dangers from deviations from safe operating procedures when they become “normalized.” The first step in avoiding “normalization of deviance” is awareness. In diving safety, we discuss the concept of “situational awareness.” Situational awareness is where we are constantly monitoring those things going on as we prepare for a dive, during the dive and afterwards. This includes the pre-dive period as our diving companions are preparing and configuring their equipment. During the dive as we monitor our depth, bottom time, breathing gas consumption and anytime changes occur that could increase our risk during a dive. Post-dive as we observe our diving companions looking for signs of issues that could have been the result of the dive. When we identify anything that could negatively impact our diving experience, our knowledge and skills should alert us to take some sort of action. 



There are many factors which may increase the likelihood of normalization of deviance. For example, there are divers, even those with lots of experience, who often develop shortcuts or neglect proper procedures, including those steps found on accepted checklists from training programs, or even those considered as standard safety procedures. The justification for conscious rule breaking often comes where the rule or standard is perceived as ineffectual. In charter boat or liveaboard diving, time pressure may be an issue that would seem to justify skipping a few steps that may be considered inconsequential.  Saving a few minutes in preparation may seem to be the right thing to do when others are waiting for you but would seem less important when things go terribly wrong once in the water. Divers may also learn a deviation without actually realizing it. Diver training only covers part of what a diver needs to know to dive, especially in some of the more challenging diving situations. Some divers will adopt modifications from other, apparently more experienced, divers that have worked for them in similar situations. They may do this without questioning or completely evaluating these modifications in procedures. And, finally, diving in a culture that permits mistakes to go uncorrected. There is a popular saying nowadays, “See something, say something.” This philosophy may certainly have value in terms of accident prevention. Diving companions may be afraid to speak up when they see something about a pre-dive preparation or even a diving skill that deviates from proper procedures or techniques. Even though we are certainly not our brother’s keeper, we do have an obligation to our diving companions to help identify something just doesn’t seem right and thus, preventing an accident. There is no problem with simply asking questions about something that is different than what we expect or different than what we’ve seen before. In fact, it is a way we may learn. You may have actually discovered a new and better way of doing something or you may have brought an error to the attention of a fellow diver, possibly preventing an unfortunate situation from occurring. One caution, however: never take anything at face value when it comes to diving or safety. Evaluate anything that is different from what you know to be correct and ask others with more experience or expertise.


Resisting the tendency to deviate from proper procedures or techniques that were developed to keep our sport and divers safe requires a willingness from every diver to always follow the skills, techniques and procedures that they were taught. One approach to combatting deviations from safe diving procedures is to develop and maintain a culture of diving safety. A safety culture is the enduring value and priority placed on safety by every diver at every level. All divers must commit to personal responsibility for safety; preserve, enhance, and communicate safety concerns as soon as they are identified; actively learn from past mistakes and the mistakes of others and apply safe behaviors based upon lessons learned. Anything less than a full commitment to a safety culture would allow deviations from proper procedures or techniques to become part of normal operating procedure that will, possibly, lead to a tragic outcome from what should be a truly wonderful diving experience. 


In order to address accidents in the use of closed-circuit rebreathers (CCRs), the technical diving community came together in 2012 at Rebreather Forum 3.0 and developed a series of recommendations to improve CCR safety. One of these recommendations was the use of checklists. The use of checklists, however, should not be confined to rebreather diving. The use of a checklist to reduce the likelihood that some critical aspect of pre-dive preparation is not missed should be an essential part of every diver’s repertoire.  Unfortunately, diving accident data and post-accident diver interviews show that checklists may still not be considered part of many diver’s safety procedures. The lack of checklist use could, in many cases, have possibly prevented a tragedy but, not using a checklist was considered, by many, normal operating procedure. While checklists should be considered a standard part of every diver’s preparatory procedures, I would also suggest combining the use of a checklist with a consistent pre-dive ritual for equipment preparation. Getting into a strict routine will certainly help prevent equipment configuration and preparation errors. 


Whether we are diving with friends, family, or others enjoying the same sport and dive site, we all want to enjoy the wonders of diving without ending up as a DAN statistic. We can all agree that a diving fatality is terrible for the sport, the industry and the loved ones that are left behind. Taking short cuts as a regular practice where these changes become “normalized” can certainly compromise our safety and the safety of our diving companions and risk taking away our most precious gift, life.


Our thanks to Scuba News, Dan Orr and Dan Orr Consulting for allowing us to republish this article.



Occidental Cozumel All-Inclusive Summer Deal

Occidental Cozumel 

All-Inclusive Summer Deal

Must Book by July 15, 2021


Get our package deal at the Occidental Grande Cozumel Resort. All-inclusive at the Occidental means Deluxe room accommodations, all meals, ALL beverages (including alcoholic), and a dive package provided by Pro Dive. Dive package includes 5 dive days with 2-tank boat dives each day.

Must book by July 15, 2021- Valid for travel August and September 2021


Diver rate $1070 per person double occupancy  -  Non-diver rate $595
Single diver rate $1378 -  Single non-diver rate  $903

          


                                                                         

Diver's Guide to the Socorro Islands

A Divers Guide to the Socorro Islands


The Revillagigedo Archipelago is made up of four islands: Socorro, Roca Partida, San Benedicto, and Clarion. Due to the popularity of the largest island, the archipelago is often referred to as the Socorro Islands. All of the islands are volcanic. The islands were declared as a marine reserve and a Mexican national park in 2017. The waters typically reach a low of 68 F (21 C) and a high of 82 F (28 C), and the weather is typically warm and sunny.  



Socorro Island rises abruptly from the sea to 1,050 meters (3,440 feet) in elevation at its summit. The island is the emerged summit of a massive, predominately submarine shield volcano. The island is part of the northern Mathematicians Ridge, a mid-ocean ridge that became largely inactive 3.5 million years ago when activity moved to the East Pacific Rise. All four islands along with the many seamounts on the ridge are post-abandonment alkaline volcanoes. Socorro Island is unusual in that it is the only dominantly silicic peralkaline volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean. It most recently erupted in late January-early February 1993, which was a submarine eruption off the coast from Punta Tosca. An earlier eruption was on May 21, 1951. Earlier eruptions probably occurred in 1905, 1896 and 1848. The island's surface is broken by furrows, small craters, and numerous ravines, and covered in lava domes, lava flows and cinder cones. 



There is a naval station, established in 1957, with a population of 250 staff and families living in a village with a church. The village stands on the western side of Bahia Vargas Lozano, a small cove with a rocky beach, about 800 meters east of Cabo Regla, the southernmost point of the island. The station is served by a dock, a local helipad and Isla Socorro airport, located six kilometers to the north. There is a freshwater spring about 5 km northwest of Cabo Regla, at the shoreline of Ensenada Grayson. This is brackish and sometimes covered by the sea at high tide. In the 1950s, a small freshwater seep was known to exist some 45 meters (49 yards) inland at Bahia Lucio Gallardo Pavon, about 800 meters NW of the naval station. 



The islands are located nearly 400 km (250 miles) from the Baja California peninsula. Due to the isolated location, the only way to visit Socorro is through liveaboard. Most visitors begin their trips by arriving at Los Cabos International Airport in Mexico. Then, divers travel 45 minutes to Cabo San Lucas where they take off on a liveaboard. It usually takes about a day for the liveaboard to arrive at the islands. 

 

The diving season lasts from November to May as that is when the often-rough waters are at their calmest. However, even the calmer waters have strong currents, making this trip best for advanced divers.


                                                    

Although the Socorro’s waters are not filled with the colorful reefs many divers look out for, the marine life more than makes up for it. Manta rays, dolphins, hammerhead sharks, tiger sharks, are just a few of the common sights in these waters. Humpback whales can even be seen on their migration path through the months of January and February, and the dolphins are known for coming into close contact with divers, most commonly from January to March.  





When divers first arrive at the islands, they often begin their scuba adventure at El Fondeadero. This dive site is located in San Benedicto’s shallower waters where there are three pinnacles and sightings of lobster and eels. The famous sightings of humpback whales are east of Socorro island at the Cabo Pearce dive site. Abundant pelagic life can be seen at the isolated Roca Partida dive site. This site is over 80 miles from San Benedicto and has a pinnacle peaking up out of the water. This site is best suited for advanced divers and has over 100 feet of visibility. 

 

When planning your next dive trip, make sure the Socorro Islands are at the top of your list. The close encounters with dolphins, sharks, and manta rays at this location are unmatched, and the humpback whale sightings are one of a kind. 







Damai I Liveaboard - Raja Ampat & Cenderawasih Bay - June 30-July 12, 2023

Damai I Liveaboard

Raja Ampat & Cenderawasih Bay

June 30-July 12, 2023

$500 Agent Discount 

Featuring U/W Photography Pro Brandi Mueller

 

* *  6 Cabins Available  * *

The ship has seven staterooms with a choice of single cabins, twins, doubles or two spacious master cabins. All cabins are furnished with either queen or king-sized beds, and ensuite toilets with showers. The ship has been designed with three large deck areas for relaxing in both the sun or shade and for enjoying relaxing massage and spa treatments. Specifically designed for divers, the vessel offers large dive stations with individual rinse tanks and a camera room with separate camera work stations. Damai offers three local dive guides and one Instructor on board throughout your trip. With only twelve guests, this is a good 4:1 guest to dive guide ratio. The ship has two custom-designed high-speed tenders to get all guests to dive sites comfortably. The signature service includes personalized dive station and rinse tank, camera room and storage space for equipment, ala-carte dining catering to all food requirements, laundry and massage service on board, and the ship has an 18-member crew.

 

 This trip will be featuring underwater photography pro Brandi Mueller to offer photo tips and sessions between dives. Bring your camera and be ready to shoot and learn..!


  


This trip departs Sorong and disembarks in Nabire. Start your trip in Raja Ampat, center of marine biodiversity in the world. Pass through Mapia, which sits closeby to a military base and contains underwater world that is pristine and untouched; no fisherman or tourism. Finish the trip in Cenderawasih Bay, famous for its resident population of whalesharks but there is also WWII history, beautiful reefs and endemic fish.


This 13 day, 12 night adventure embarks at Sorong and disembarks at Nabire, and includes stateroom accommodation, 3 meals a day, complimentary wine with dinner, nitrox for certified divers, unlimited diving with the dive day built around four daily dives, laundry service, airport transfers.


Cost: Stateroom Cabin - $5,550 per person double occupancy including taxes and a $500 DISCOUNT

FULL TRIP ITINERARY

Day 1: Arrive Sorong

Guests will arrive in Sorong and have time to get comfortable on the boat. Damai will travel west to Matan for a check-out dive.

No. of Dives: 1

 

Day 2: Penemu

The signature sites in Penemu are Barracuda Point; a seamount on the north point; Melissa's Garden; a beautiful example of a hard-coral plateau and Keruo Channel; drift along this colorful slope watching the seascape go by. The highlight of Penemu is a lagoon tour in the tender boats amongst these turquoise waters and limestone bays. For the energetic there is a short walk to the top of one the hills to be rewarded with an amazing view over the lagoon with Damai moored in the distance. Long Crossing to Farondi.

No. of Dives: 4

 

Day 3: Manta Sandy & Arborek

Manta Sandy is a signature site for experiencing the grace of Reef Mantas. They are frequent visitors to the cleaning stations dotted along this sandy channel. Feel free to explore the sand for small critters while you are waiting for an appearance. Arborek Jetty is part of a sloping reef in front of the island. There are schools of fish, excellent wide-angle photo opportunities under the jetty itself and good critter hunting to be done along the slopes. In the late afternoon take a stroll around the village on the island and maybe join in one of their soccer matches or buy a locally made sunhat.

No. of Dives: 4

 

Day 4: Kri & Dampier Straits

At the eastern end of the famous Dampier Strait there are many signature dive sites. Cape Kri is a sloping reef on the eastern end of the island of Kri; Blue Magic and Sardine reef are seamounts covered in schooling fish and cruising sharks and rays; Mioskon is a great spot for the endemic Wobbegong shark and Pontohi pygmy seahorses.

No. of Dives: 4

 

Day 5: Pulau Dua

Half-way between Raja Ampat and Cenderawasih bay we will make a stop in these small islands where remains of the Second World War were thrown into the sea making a small, but superb reefs where life concentrates in large numbers. Big school of yellow grunt, large napoleon fish or barramundis find shelter. In the evening, if the conditions so consider, we will go to the beach to see the leatherback turtle nesting.

No. of Dives: 2 or 3


Day 6 and 7: Mapia

The last atoll in Indonesian waters, very close to the border with Palau, too remote for fisherman to go, and protected by a small navy post. The combination of all these factors mean only one thing: superb diving: pristine waters, hard corals and drop-offs and a tremendous amount of fish. Rare opportunity to see reefs in the way they were many years ago, and a delight to all our senses.

No. of Dives: 3 or 4

 

Day 8: Pulau Manim

Manim is home to calm waters and 7 sunken landing craft left behind after WWII. These are in a variety of depths from 5 to 25m and are covered in a variety of hard and soft corals.

No. of Dives: 4

 

Day 9: Outer Atolls

The outer atolls of Cenderawasih Bay are some of fishiest sites of the area, located inside the National Park. Wild Fish Ridge and Spag point are two paricular favourites. It is here that we can view so many of the endemic species that led this to be called the Galapagos of the East.

No. of Dives: 4

 

Day 10: Tanjung Manguar / Pulau Nusir

Tanjung Mangguar is an extensive dive site with a wall on one side and a plateau of hard corals on the other. There are some magnificant sponges and lots of plump soft corals to add some colour to the reef. This is a good chance to see some of the endemic fish species and there is a school of resident blackfin barracuda.

No. of Dives: 4

 

Day 11 and 12: Teluk Wororomi

This is the Whale Shark bay and the local fishing platforms attract many of the ocean's largest fish. After local reporting is complete divers will be offered an open dive deck so that they may spend as much time as possible in the water with these amazing creatures. The Whale Sharks here are a resident population of pre-adolescents, mainly males, who are come to the platforms to feed on the small bait fish that sit in the nets that hang beneath. They are apparently unconcerned by divers and tirelessly circle back again and again to feed upon morsels of fish hand-fed to them by the fishermen who regard them as good luck.

No. of Dives: Unlimited dives / snorkelling

 

Day 13: Departure

Guests will be escorted to the airport in Nabire and assisted with check-in procedures, no doubt full of talk about the wonders of the most popular dive destination in the world.


    

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