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Tubbataha Reef - Philippines - Azores Liveaboard - June 4-11, 2022

Tubbataha Reef

The Philippines - A UNESCO World Heritage Site

Azores Liveaboard - June 4-11, 2022 - $3995 PPDO

The Philippines have opened their borders and now you can dive one of the best dive sites in the world... Tubbataha Reef.

Our charter gets you to this pristine location that has not seen scuba divers for more than 2 years. You can be among some of first the divers to experience this amazing location. The Tubbataha Natural Park, also known as the Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park, is a protected area of the Philippines located in the middle of the Sulu Sea and east of Palawan. The marine and bird sanctuary consists of two huge atolls and the smaller Jessie Beazley Reef covering a total area of 97,030 hectares.

   

   

Our Trip:

7 Nights, Check-in June 4, 2022 and Check-out June 11, 2022 - $3995 PPDO


Inclusions:

  • Deluxe stateroom or Owner's Suite (upgrade) accommodations
  • All meals & snacks, local soft drinks
  • Up to 5 dives per day including night diving - night dives are subject to conditions 
  • Social servings of local beer & rum and social servings of wine with dinner
  • Unlimited Nitrox valued at $204.00

 

Exclusions: 

  • Transfers to/from Manila and Puerto Princessa - Round trip transfers between Manila and Puerto Princessa are $244.00 per person.  Rate includes roundtrip domestic economy airfare between Manila and Puerto Princessa with 70 lbs. of checked luggage per person,  domestic terminal fees, private air-conditioned van between the international terminal and domestic terminal in Manila, round trip private air-conditioned transfers between Puerto Princessa Airport and the Azores,  personal airport ‘Meet & Greet’, and luggage assistance.  This rate is subject to change and applies when at least a minimum of 4 are traveling together on the same transfers otherwise a different transfer rate may apply. 
  • Marine Park Fee - $120.00 Marine park fees
  • Equipment Rental, onboard purchases, classes
  • Emergency fuel surcharges, if needed.

How to get to the Philippines and Tubbataha: Divers fly to Manila (MNL) then take a domestic flight to Puerto Princesa (PPR) located on the island of Palawan. Guests board the Atlantis Azores on Saturday at 5 pm. The boat leaves port around 7pm for the 10-hour journey to Tubbataha and arrives the next morning to start diving.


Tubbataha Dive Sites
Northern Tip of North Atoll
Fissures and crevices lead into it where nurse and whitetip reef sharks can be found resting during the day. Small manta rays, stingrays, and spotted eagle rays, together with numerous turtles have all been spotted. The wall has huge gorgonian fan corals, soft corals, and barrel sponges. Blacktip, whitetip, and grey reef sharks can normally be seen.
Southern End of North Atoll
Malayan, Wallstreet, and Amos Rock are the best dive sites. Photographers will enjoy these sites with Denise pygmy seahorses clinging to the sea fans. Scorpion fish, moray eels, and ghost pipefish are found. 
Northern Tip of South Atoll
Highlights include Black Rock, T Wreck, and Eiger Wall. You will lose count of the number of green and hawksbill turtles in the area and marble stingrays in the sand. Eagle rays and large grouper and giant trevally are seen.
Southern End of South Atoll
This area is known for its lighthouse and is home to famous dive sites Delsan Wreck and Black Rock. Hammerheads and occasional whale sharks are seen. Guitar sharks are found in the shallows.
Jessie Beazley Reef
On Jessie Beazley Reef you can see schools of bumphead parrotfish and napoleon wrasse. The shallow reefs are full of colorful tropical fish like the regal angelfish and titan triggerfish.
Southern End of North Atoll
The dive starts on a gentle slope that is covered in superb unmolested corals and ends with a wall covered with dramatic gorgonian fans where divers can often spot pygmy seahorses. If there’s current, you’ll come across a wide variety of large fish, including narrow-barred spanish mackerel, giant trevally, red snapper, napoleon wrasse, and giant groupers.

You can make this a Combo Trip
Add the Atlantis Dumaguete Resort - $2336 PPDO

    

7 Nights, Check-in May 28, 2022 and Check-out June 4, 2022  $2336 PPDO

  

Inclusions:

1)  7 nights deluxe room double occupancy, Free Upgrade to Garden Suites subject to availability

2)  All meals at Toko's Restaurant

3)  Coffee, hot tea, iced tea, and filtered water are complimentary throughout the day. Italian, other specialty coffees, and fresh juice are complimentary until 10am with breakfast and available for a fee thereafter.

4)  Up to 5 dives a day including night diving

5)  Apo Island Day Trip

6)  Unlimited internet access

7)  Unlimited Nitrox valued at $156.00


 Exclusions:

1)  Atlantis provides round-trip transfers between Manila and Dumaguete at a cost of $208.00 per person. Rate includes roundtrip domestic economy airfare between Manila and Dumaguete with 70 lbs. of checked luggage per person,  domestic terminal fees, private air-conditioned van between the international terminal and domestic terminal in Manila, round trip private air-conditioned transfers between Dumaguete Airport and resort, personal airport ‘Meet & Greet’, and luggage assistance. This rate is subject to change and applies when 4 to 15 guests are traveling together on the same transfer otherwise a different transfer rate may apply.


2)  The marine park fees are approximately $120.00. This estimate may be high as actual fees are charged by dive in 2021 at 210 pesos per day dive and 350 pesos for night dives.  Guests pay these fees at the resort on their personal bill at check-out. These fees are set by local municipalities and can change at any time.


3)  You can purchase additional day trips to Apo or Sumillon for $114.00. A day trip to the whale sharks at Oslob is $138.00. Rates are subject to change.

Rocio del Mar Liveaboard - Socorro Islands - Nov 2023

Rocio del Mar Liveaboard

Socorro Islands

Nov 29 to December 8, 2023

Published Rate $4095, Our Rate $3600 PPDO



 **  Get our discounted rate of $3600 USD per person double occupancy  **

The Revillagigedo Islands (also Revillagigedo Archipelago or Islas Revillagigedo) are a group of four volcanic islands in the Pacific Ocean, known for their unique ecosystem. The islands are home to many endemic plant and animal species, and are sometimes called Mexico's "little Galapagos".  Socorro island is the most diverse in flora, fauna, and topography.

The islands lie 250 miles off Baja Mexico's southern shore. When embarking on a trip to the Socorro Islands; possible destinations on the itinerary are San Benedicto, Socorro, Roca Partida, and Clarion Islands.

These islands are a spectacular magnet for the largest ocean pelagic animals in the world. Schooling Hammerhead sharks, Tiger sharks, dolphins, silky sharks, Galapagos sharks, clouds of jacks and barracuda, tuna, wahoo, oceanic white tips sharks, whale sharks, and mantas.

Day 1 - Board the boat at 5pm / Dinner is served at 7pm / Boat departs shortly thereafter

Day 2 - At Sea

Day 3 - San Benedicto - 4 dives scheduled

Day 4 - Roca Partida - 3 dives scheduled

Day 5 - Roca Partida - 3 dives scheduled

Day 6 - Socorro Island - 3 dives scheduled (check in with naval station)

Day 7 - Socorro Island - 4 dives scheduled

Day 8 - San Benedicto - 4 dives scheduled - at the end of the day we will start our return to San Jose del Cabo

Day 9 - At Sea

Day 10 - Arrive at San Jose del Cabo in the early morning hours - disembark at 8:30 am

    

    

   

5 Reasons to Choose a Liveaboard

5 Reasons to Choose a Liveaboard

1. Excellent value for money

 

Who doesn’t appreciate good value for their money? Organizing a diving trip on your own can be costly. In most cases, you pay for your hotel, transport, food, equipment rental, and diving separately. These things can add up, leaving the most passionate divers wishing they’d taken up snorkeling at their local beach instead. One of the most attractive aspects of liveaboard diving is just how cost-effective it is. Liveaboard charters include all your dives, accommodation, and meals. These dives will be in some of the most exotic sites that the world has to offer. You also get your air refills, meals, snacks, and drinks included in the cost, and many liveaboards offer free nitrox. 



2. More dives each day

 

If you love scuba diving as much as we do, then you will want to make the most of being in the water. With 3-4 dives a day you’ll have plenty of time to explore the beauties of the underwater world. Your itinerary could look something like this: a refreshing, early morning dive to start your day, a mid-morning channel dive to build your appetite for lunch, an exciting wreck dive in the afternoon, and an adrenaline-fuelled night dive with nurse sharks to finish off the day. What diver doesn’t love having more dives, more locations, and more experiences all in one day?



3. Pristine dive sites


The more accessible a dive spot is, the more divers you’ll usually find on the reef. Too many divers on one site can result in poor visibility and damaged reef systems. These things can impact the enjoyment of your diving experience. Nobody wants to go on a dive vacation just to see few fish and poor visibility. Many of the dive destinations our dive buddies experience are only accessible by liveaboard boats. The result is that the dive sites are pristine with an abundance of undisturbed marine critters to share your dive. With multiple dives a day there is plenty for you to explore. We offer trips around the world including the Red Sea, the Maldives, the Galapagos, the Socorro Islands, Sea of Cortez, Indonesia, the Solomon Islands, Fiji, Truk Lagoon, and Palau to name a few.



4. Hassle-Free Diving


From the joy that comes once you have made that giant stride and submerged yourself in the water, most divers will agree that diving’s downsides take place above the water. Thankfully, liveaboards save you from these challenges. On most boats, the crew will help you get out of the water and will also help remove your fins and BCD. The crews make sure you don’t have to lift finger before or after your dive. And You will wake up on top of your next dive site. Plus, being on a liveaboard boat takes away the hassle of getting between site locations. You can relax in plush surroundings, while the captain navigates to your next inspirational dive site.



5. Comfortable and flexible surroundings


On a liveaboard, the crew will ensure you enjoy your fourth dive as much as your first. Wouldn’t it be better to spend time between dives relaxing? Wouldn’t you rather spend time talking to your buddy about the experience that you just shared? Liveaboards are designed to make your time out of the water as memorable as your time within it. Whether you are swimming with a whale shark or sitting on a spacious deck, sipping a beverage, and admiring the sunset, the whole experience is designed to be easy and comfortable. Can you think of anything better than falling asleep listening to the sounds of the sea while drifting off in a remote corner of the world? Waking up on top of your next dive site?




                                                                               

Eight Awesome Wreck Dives in the Red Sea

Eight Awesome Wreck Dives in the Red Sea, Egypt

The Red Sea gets its name from the algae blooms that can turn the blue waters red, and it is a direct translation from its Ancient Greek name: Erythra Thalassa. The sea is nestled between two continents: Asia and Africa, and it connects to the Mediterranean Sea. It is famous for its warm, salty waters and is known for its abundant sea life that lives amongst the coral reefs. It is also a sea that has been highly traveled for centuries, making it a great spot to explore some of the most unique wrecks. Here are just a few of the many amazing wrecks the Red Sea has to explore.


SS Dunraven, Sinai Pennsula


                                                     

Having spent over a century in the water, SS Dunraven is known for being a great dive for wreck and reef lovers alike. Not only is it covered in decades worth of coral growth, but a reef wall is located nearby. The ship sank after colliding with a large rock, and it now lays flipped over on the seafloor. There are many large entrances to the ship, making it easy for newer divers to explore. Marine life often consists of goat fishes, barracudas, and even turtles! There is also plenty of macro life that is great for photographers such as nudibranchs or even the ghost pipefish. The wreck is located just off the tip of the Sinai Peninsula in Egypt, and guests often reach the ship from Hurghada or Sharm el Sheikh. Photos courtesy of cassiopeiasafari.com.



 Giannis D, El Gouna


                                          

Giannis D is unique in that it is perhaps one of the most accessible wreck dives. The wreck is located less than five meters deep, so visitors who are only able to dive in open water can experience the wreck. The wreck lies at a 45-degree angle, making it a more challenging dive for those looking to enter the ship. More experienced divers can explore the interior of the ship, even the complex engine room with many twists and turns. Arriving at this exciting wreck is easy for visitors, as it is just a boat ride away from El Gouna or Hurghada. Photo courtesy of cassiopeiasafari.com.


Rosalie Moller


                                         


Having sunk just a mere 48 hours after the famous SS Thisleform, Rosalie Moller has spent decades growing thick coral all over its exterior. It is also home to countless artifacts from World War II, so it is a great site for those looking to catch a glimpse of history. Diving the Rosalie Moller is most popular amongst technical divers as the ship lies about 55 meters deep. The wreck is vibrant with pelagic life such as reef sharks and tuna. Due to its deep, isolated location, guests are only able to access the wreck through a liveaboard or private charter. 



Kingston, Strait of Gubal, North Red Sea


                                     

The Kingston ship sunk after colliding with Shag Rock Reef — located just off the shore of North Stradbroke Island. No lives were lost in the wreck, and the ship sits around 10 to 20 meters deep. The wreck occurred in 1881 and has since grown into a stunning living reef teeming with marine life. Most notably are the sea turtles, pelagic fish, and schools of anthias. The wreck is sitting almost perfectly straight, making it a great opportunity for beginning divers to explore a wreck with ease.  Most visitors experience this wreck from liveaboards, but it can also be done on the second tank of a day trip.  Photo courtesy of oceanstopines.com.


SS Carnatic, Abu Nuhas Reef, Egypt


                                          

Abu Nuhas reef is home to the famous Ship Graveyard, consisting of seven different ship shipwrecks in 1869. Perhaps one of the most notable wrecks is the SS Carnatic. The ship is located on the northern side of the reef and broke in half as it sunk. The ship has become entirely encrusted with hard and soft corals and is most known for its stories of buried treasure. Legend has it that the ship was carrying gold and copper that would eventually sink with it, and anyone who disturbs this lost treasure leaves the wreck cursed. Photo: Shutterstock



Salem Express, Hyndman Reef, Egypt 


                                    

One of the most recent, and most emotional, wrecks of the Red Sea is the Salem Express. The ship sunk in 1991 after colliding with Hyndman Reef. This caused the ship to take on great amounts of water, and it quickly sunk after a few minutes. Although the exact number of lives lost is disputed, it is possible that 1,600 people could have died on board the Salem Express. Nearly 700 of these people are believed to have been pilgrims who had just visited Mecca. There is not much marine life or corals growing on the ship, but divers often see items such as passenger’s suitcases in the surrounding areas of the wreck. The inside of the ship is sealed out of respect for every life that was lost on board. Photo: Shutterstock


Aida, Big Brother Island, Egypt


                                           

An iconic liveaboard destination are the Brothers Islands of Egypt. Aida is a wreck lodged in the reef just off of Big Brother Island at 25 to 60 meters deep. Those who visit this wreck range anywhere from casual divers hoping to see the beautiful coral to technical divers wanting to investigate the depths of the wreck. Divers often see large schools of fish and even the occasional pelagic such as the oceanic whitetip. This wreck is usually explored as a drift dive due to the strong currents, but for guests who want more time at the wreck, they can arrange a private charter for a more personalized experience. Photo: Shutterstock


SS Thistlegorm, Ras Muhammad, Egypt


                                         

Any list of the best wrecks in the Red Sea would be incomplete without mentioning the SS Thistlegorm. As one of the most famous ships to live in the Red Sea, the ship has sat for 80 years and is now teeming with marine life such as common reef fish, batfish, and barracudas. The ship once served the British Navy before it sank as the result of German bombs. Divers are able to find remnants of the past such as sunken ammo, motorcycles, rifles, Jeeps, and more. The wreck is easily accessed by boat and is typically a day-long dive due to the large size of the ship. The waters have a visibility of 25-30 meters and are ideal for advanced divers who are able to navigate the strong currents. Photo: Shutterstock

Six Awesome Liveaboard Destinations

Six Awesome Liveaboard Destinations

 

Liveaboards provide a one-of-a-kind experience for travelers looking to fully submerge themselves into a diving adventure. Guests are able to spend a week (or more!) filling their days with diving and their nights watching the sunset across the open water. Liveaboards can provide all of the same luxuries as a typical on land resort such as spa treatments, snorkeling, gourmet meals, and excursions. Here are our picks of some of the six best destinations for a liveaboard vacation.


1) Galápagos Islands - Ecuador


                                          


The Galapagos Islands are scattered across the equator and have warm weather year-round. While diving in the Pacific waters surrounding the islands is great all year, December to May is the warmest season with the calmest waters and highest visibility. Divers during this season most often see hammerhead sharks and manta rays. July to November is ideal for more advanced divers hoping for more intense, choppier waters. Although the ocean is generally a bit colder during this season, it is known for nutrient-rich water that attracts all kinds of sea life, specifically whale sharks. Diving in the Galapagos is done on liveaboards from tenders or Zodiacs, and guests are able to have a unique experience living out on the open waters. 


2) Socorro Island - Mexico


                                              

Socorro Island is the largest island in the Revillagigedo Archipelago and is famous for its vibrant wildlife, both on and off the shore. The volcanic island does not have an airport, making it a popular spot for liveaboards. The diving season lasts from November to May as that is when the water is at its calmest. Throughout this season, divers often get to see hammerhead sharks, manta rays, whale sharks, and humpback whales. From January to March, there are even frequent sightings of bottlenose dolphins. In addition to these, sightings of silky sharks, Galapagos sharks, whitetip reef sharks, and silvertip sharks are possible as well. Getting to the Socorros requires an open ocean crossing about 22 hours from Cabo San Lucas, Baja California.


3) Raja Ampat - Indonesia


                                      


Located off the coast of Bird’s Head Peninsula in West Papua, Raja Ampat is an Indonesian archipelago that is known for its extensive biodiversity. The islands form part of the Coral Triangle — an area known as a home to 76% of known coral species. In Raja Ampat’s waters, there is countless marine life and stunning coral reefs to see. The most popular sights include manta rays, reef sharks, walking sharks, turtles, nudibranchs, and so much more. Diving in Raja Ampat is ideal from October to April as it has the driest weather with calm seas that make for smooth liveaboard sailing. The clear waters consistently have a visibility of 80-100 ft all year long, which is perfect for spotting even the smallest of critters. 


4) Tubbataha Reef - Philippines


                                      

Tubbataha Reef is a protected marine park in the Philippines’ Sula Sea. It is known for being a nesting ground for green sea turtles and is made up of a northern atoll, southern atoll, and the Jessie Beazley Reef.  Visitors can only explore the clear waters from a liveaboard as it is located over 10 hours away from land. The diving season takes place from mid-March to mid-June as that is when the water is at its calmest and clearest with a visibility of up to 114 feet. The reef is known for its vast biodiversity as it is reported to have over 1,200 species — 181 of which are threatened.


5) Solomon Islands - Oceania Pacific

                                        


Diving in the Solomon Islands is perfect for visitors hoping for a more private, secluded experience with untouched reefs. There are nearly a thousand islands in the archipelago, and almost all of them are uninhabited. The water temperature is consistently in the low to high 80s, making it comfortable to dive in year-round. However, January through April is monsoon season, which brings the greatest amounts of wind and rain that could disrupt diving. What makes the Solomon Islands so unique is that their waters hold a time capsule that sends divers back to World War II with its numerous plane and shipwrecks at various depths. In addition to these one-of-a-kind wrecks, divers can also explore reefs, walls, slopes, pinnacles, and more. Visitors can choose to spend their time in the Solomon Islands on a liveaboard or from a resort on land.


6) Chuuk Lagoon - Micronesia


                                       


Chuuk Lagoon is a mountainous island that was once a former Japanese naval base during the second world war. The island’s history has been kept alive in its own waters with its array of sunken treasure, submerged ships teeming with marine life, and even human remains. Divers in the Lagoon’s Pacific waters get to explore part of this history, and often even find artifacts such as ammunition or guns. The wrecks vary in their depth, making them accessible for just about any level of diver. The temperature is consistently warm year-round; however, December to April is ideal due to the lack of rainfall and wind during this season. 

Rocio del Mar Liveaboard - Sea of Cortez 2021 Trips - Dive Adventure

Rocio del Mar Liveaboard

Sea of Cortez 2021 Trips

Awesome Dive Adventures

Saturday to Saturday
$2,845 per person, double occupancy

Liquid Diving Adventures Price $2,645 - SAVE $200

                                    

Called "The World's Aquarium" by Jacques Cousteau, the Sea of Cortez provides a world-class international dive experience with a domestic flight. Simply fly to Phoenix, Arizona, and, in just a few hours, guests are boarding the boat in Puerto Penasco, Mexico. 

The Sea of Cortez is a breathtaking destination for scuba diving, snorkeling, and exploration. Dive on untouched walls and reefs abounding in marine life. Encounter large and small whale species, snorkel with whale sharks, dive with playful sea lions, and see countless eels, octopus, fish, and jumping mobula rays. It's a macro photographer's dream with nudibranchs, colorful blennies, dancing jawfish, and sea horses. 

                                    

Between dives, guests hike and explore remote uninhabited islets and at night gaze at the Milky Way. Give the Rocio crew one week and they will create a lifetime of memories while forging new friendships aboard Rocio del Mar. Guests will dine on incredible cuisine and enjoy the friendly service that has made the crew famous.

           July 3-10, 2021 - July 10-17, 2021 - July 31-August 7, 2021 - August 7-14, 2021
                          August 28-September 4, 2021  -  September 4-11, 2021

Photographing Giant Mantas - Socorro Islands, Mexico

Photographing the World’s Friendliest Mantas


Article by Brandi Mueller ( www.brandiunderwater.com )

 

As far as amazing underwater encounters go, diving with manta rays is one of the best. These spaceship-looking animals can look almost scary at first glance with their wingspans averaging eight to twelve feet (some documented to be over thirty feet), but as they glide smoothly over the top of a diver exhaling bubbles, it’s easy to see they are really beautiful, gentle creatures. 


                                 

In spite of their massive size, mantas eat plankton, the itty bitty animals we hardly even notice in the water. They use cephalic fins, paddle-like appendages on both sides of their mouth, to funnel in water (and food). Often when they do this they swim in giant loops through the water column, like beautiful acrobatic dancers dressed in black and white. 

 

With mostly black back, the undersides of mantas are a pattern of black and white unique and individual to each animal like a fingerprint. There are two types of mantas, black mantas which are mostly black with only a little white on their bellies and chevron mantas which have two white marks on their top side and much more white on their bellies. Images of the manta’s ventral sides have been used to identify and track mantas.

 

While mantas live in many of our favorite diving locations, including tropical to subtropical waters, we usually only see them if we get really lucky. But around the Revillagigedo Archipelago (known as the Socorro Islands) offshore of Baja, Mexico, divers are almost guaranteed manta sightings, and not just fleeting fly-bys. Known as the world’s friendliest mantas, those residing around Socorro seem to willingly interact with divers, spending entire dives just swimming from diver to diver, making eye contact, and checking the humans out.

 

The area also has cleaning stations where the mantas get a bit of a spa treatment. Clarion angelfish, cleaner wrasse, and other fish come in to clean the parasites and dead skin off the mantas. This symbiotic relationship helps both parties: the manta gets a good bath and the fish get dinner. For some reason these mantas also seem to enjoy the bubbles divers give off, perhaps it feels like a massage or tickles a bit? The mantas seem to swim right into the bubbles overtop a diver.


                                   

Tips for Photographing Mantas

·       Just Breath – The mantas seem to like the massage-like feeling of diver’s exhaled bubbles and they will come around and swim right over top of divers. I almost felt like some manta even seem to take turns with us, visiting each of us, so we all got to see them (maybe they were seeing whose bubbles were best.) So just by exhaling, you can get up-close and personal to take images of these beautiful animals.

·       Don’t Chase – Like any animals, if something seems to be chasing them, they run (or swim) away. Just stay in one spot and wait for the mantas to come to you. Sometimes strong swimming divers can even chase a manta off and it won’t come back for the rest of the dive.

·       Go Fisheye – The mantas are big and they get close. Use your widest, wide-angle lens. Nothing is worse than cutting off a wingtip in an image because the manta was too big and too close to you! For compact camera users, invest in a wet-mount wide-angle lens.

·       Get Settings Ready – The mantas will usually make a similar pattern over divers again and again. Do a few test shots if you can and have your settings and strobes ready to catch the moment you want. And if you missed it, set it up again and usually you just have to wait a little bit before the manta comes back and swims over again.

·       Shoot in Different Directions – I like to stay at the edge of the dive group so that I can shoot into the crowd and get images with divers and then also turn a bit and get shots with the mantas but without divers in the shot. It’s nice to have a variety.

·       Look behind you – Often the mantas are coming into the cleaning station area from the blue and you won’t see them until they’ve passed over you. Always keep an eye out all around.

·       Get Creative – Diving with the Socorro mantas is a rare opportunity where you can expect to have a lot of time and chances to take photos of your subject. Once you have a ton of shots making images in the style you usually do, try something different. Play with your camera settings, adjust your strobe positioning (even turn them off and take some ambient light photos) and strength, take some video. You may not like all the images that come out, but you may get some amazing shots!

 

Diving Socorro is not just about mantas either! Divers are likely to see sharks of many species including piles of white tips, hammerheads, silvertips, Galapagos, and while it’s not actually a shark, some lucky visitors may see a whale shark or two. Almost as friendly as the mantas are the dolphins and the islands themselves make for great images too! Socorro should be on every manta-lover and diver’s bucket list. It will not disappoint!


                                 

These photos are from a trip Brandi took on the Nautilus Belle Amie to the Socorro Islands December 5-12, 2020. You can book thrips with Liquid Diving Adventures to the Socorro Islands as well as many other amazing destinations worldwide.


Grand Sea Explorer Liveaboard - Egyptian Red Sea - Save $300 - Dive Travel Adventure

Grand Sea Explorer Liveaboard

Egyptian Red Sea Dive Travel Adventure

Save $300


The Red Sea in Egypt is one of the planet’s most exotic and captivating natural environments. There are few places in the world where you'll find such a diverse array of radiant corals, schooling pelagics, and plentiful marine life along with topside extensions to sites that date to antiquity – it is little wonder that divers refer to the Red Sea as legendary.

We have trip dates in March and April 2021 with a $00 discount from Explorer Ventures and an additional $100 Agent Discount from our team. You must book this package before January 6, 2021 to take advantage of this offer.

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