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Beginners Guide to Exploring the Ocean - Part II

Scuba Diving 101 - Part II

A Beginners Guide to Exploring the Ocean

Originally posted on Porch.com


By


Paula Hernandez


Diving Preparation Tips



Before you “dive in,” there are several important things to consider. Remember that each step in the preparation process is vital to be comfortable and safe in the water. If you’re not familiar with swimming in the ocean, take a few swimming practice lessons before you start diving.

      Take local diving lessons: Before you spend money on scuba equipment and get your certification, it’s a good idea to take a few diving lessons near you. These lessons typically take place in a standard swimming pool, so you won’t need to travel long distances or live near the ocean to get in some basic practice.

      Get your certification: It’s recommended that you take the PADI Open Water Certification training before you start scuba diving. This course takes two full days to complete, with a lesson in diving theory completed beforehand. Once you receive your certification, it is good for life and never expires, so it’s well worth the effort upfront. If you’re traveling after you get your certificate, wait at least 24 hours from your last dive before you fly to your destination so your lungs can acclimate.

      Learn marine biology: You don’t need to be an expert in marine biology, but some certifications include a brief course to help you learn more about the fish, plants, and animals that inhabit our oceans. If your training doesn’t include marine biology, feel free to buy a few books on the subject or read articles about it online to help you learn.

      Get the right equipment: Every scuba diver needs the right equipment to ensure a safe dive.

o   How to obtain equipment: You can choose to rent your equipment from a scuba dive center near your dive location at a reasonable cost. However, if you’re planning to dive more frequently, investing in your own equipment is well worth the price. Key items include goggles or a face mask, a wetsuit, fins, a scuba tank, a regulator, a snorkel, and a depth gauge.

o   Bring a camera: Cameras and video cameras are optional, but they provide an amazing opportunity to capture incredible images and videos. Make sure that your camera equipment is designed for use underwater. A snoot is a great accessory that provides light to help you capture dramatic photos underwater. You can use it to adjust the lighting underwater for spectacular macro photography, and create the best photo album!

o   How much does it cost? Your dive training should cost between around $350 and $450 or more, depending on the type of certification and location. Personal equipment like fins, goggles, and wetsuits can run between $200 and $300 on the low side. If you’re investing in professional equipment such as gauges and cameras, plan to spend several hundred dollars more on each. Budget for between $700 and $1,000 if you’re a beginner, which should include your certification and all of the basic gear you’ll need to get started.

o   Where to store your equipment at home? Proper Storage is the key to keeping your scuba equipment in good condition. Rinse used gear off with a hose before putting it away to remove salt and mineral buildup. Ensure that every item is completely dry before putting it in storage. Hang wetsuits up in a clean, dry area away from direct sunlight or high temperatures. You can keep equipment like your snorkel, fins, and facemask in a sealed plastic container or a plastic bin with a lid in between dives.

Planning Your Trip


Once you’re certified and have all of your equipment, it’s time to start planning your first official dive.

      Find the best place to scuba dive: If you’re staying within the United States, there are several fascinating places to discover. Try Monterey, California, home to a massive kelp forest filled with a fantastic range of sea life. Ginnie Springs, Florida, has crystal clear waters and is an excellent East Coast option with three dive sites within the park. Maui, Hawaii, is home to many popular scuba diving sites filled with turtles, fish, rays, and unique underwater lava tubes. Explore several options to dive near you or plan a trip to an exotic location to discover new worlds and species.

      Choose a dive shop: When looking for dive shops, make sure they are PADI certified for your safety. These dive shops are easy to find with a simple Google search or via scuba diving Facebook groups and on Twitter and other social media outlets.

Important Scuba Diving Safety Tips


Part of your diving certification training will include information about the safety precautions every diver should take. Here are some basic safety tips to always keep in mind before, during, and after a dive.

      Get a medical examination: If you’re fit and healthy, a medical exam is not required, but it can help to ensure that you’re in good health before you start diving. If you feel unwell, don’t dive until you’re feeling completely healthy. You’ll need to sign a medical statement before you dive, so it’s best to confirm that you’re in good shape before you start.

      Food: Stick to light, well-balanced meals before any scuba diving trip and wait at least two hours before getting in the water. Remember to drink plenty of water and avoid consuming any alcohol on the day of your dive.

      Sleep: Make sure that you get plenty of restful sleep the night before your dive. At least six hours is recommended, but eight is preferable.

      Ear pain: You may notice mild ear discomfort called ear barotrauma when you dive due to a pressure imbalance between the middle ear canal and the water pressure outside your ears. Use an exercise called the Valsalva maneuver to help restore the balance in your ears.

      How long before can you fly after scuba diving? Always wait at least 24 hours after your last dive before you fly. When you fly in a pressurized environment, it can cause decompression sickness if you don’t give the nitrogen in your lungs time to dissipate.

      Listen to your dive guide: Listen carefully to your dive guide, and make sure that you always keep them within view. Follow the guide’s instructions regarding where you will be going, what you should do, and what to look out for.

      Try meditative breathing: If you feel anxious while diving, slow down and take some deep, meditative breaths. Two short inhales, and one long exhale can help you feel calm and more relaxed.

      Don’t touch anything: Never touch anything while you’re diving. Coral reefs and oceans contain a variety of species that can be poisonous or even deadly. Plus, touching plants and marine life can cause harm to the living things in the ocean.

     Can scuba diving be sustainable? Scuba diving can be a sustainable sport if you follow a few basic practices. This includes never touching or taking anything from the ocean, never feeding sharks, and learning to use a flash camera correctly. Avoid using single-use plastic while on-board so that it doesn’t accidentally get into the ocean. Choose a scuba dive program that focuses on sustainability and uses good policies regarding eco-friendly equipment and methods.


Other Fun Underwater Activities: Snorkeling




Aside from scuba diving, you can also have fun underwater with snorkeling. While scuba diving involves using an underwater apparatus that allows you to go deep underwater, snorkeling lets you explore shallower waters. When you’re snorkeling, you will stay near the surface of the water and use a mask and a breathing tube called a snorkel. You’ll be able to discover beautiful panoramic underwater views from above without ever having to deep dive underwater. Snorkeling is also a great alternative to scuba diving for children, beginners, or those who simply want to enjoy a quick hour or two of exploring without complicated equipment.


The sport of scuba diving provides you with a wonderful way to reflect and do something you love. It’s also an excellent opportunity to try a new activity, get some exercise, and gain a new appreciation for the beauty of our world’s open waters. Scuba diving shows you how fragile nature is, and it opens your mind to exploring and discovering new species, environments, and much more. 

Originally posted on Porch.com


By

Paula Hernandez

Beginner’s Guide to Exploring the Ocean - Part I

Scuba Diving 101 - Part I

A Beginners Guide to Exploring the Ocean

Originally posted on Porch.com


By


Paula Hernandez



Scuba diving is a fascinating sport that provides you with a wonderful way to open yourself up to discovering new worlds and new experiences. Even if you’re new to scuba diving, it’s a great way to get out and explore the world while getting healthy exercise. The ocean is a place filled with wonder, and scuba diving allows you to experience this incredible part of nature in an up-close and personal way. When you are scuba diving, it will enable you to be present and to get inspired in new, creative ways. This fun sport can become your new favorite hobby, or you might even advance to becoming an expert in the sport over time. You can also enjoy traveling, swimming, and capturing amazing photographs as part of the diving experience. It’s a great way to enjoy spending time alone or with your friends, and also gives you the chance to meet new fellow scuba enthusiasts. As you learn to scuba dive, you’ll learn how to control your breathing, listen to your heartbeat, and simply soak up the moment as you’re filled with wonder and awe. This guide has some helpful tips for beginners, so you can rid any fears of the unknown and dive into a new adventure.

Fascinating Facts About the Ocean



The ocean is an inspiring and mysterious place. Here are a few fantastic and fascinating facts about the world’s oceans.

      97-percent of the earth’s water consists of the ocean, and seven percent of the oceans are covered by sea ice.

      The Great Barrier Reef is so large that it can be seen from the moon.

      There are 230,000 known marine species, but over two million are estimated to exist.

      The Bahamas has the largest underwater cliffs in the world, with a sheer drop of up to 13,100 feet.

      Many species living at the bottom of the ocean glow in the dark. This process is a chemical reaction called bioluminescence.

      The oceans travel along the Global Ocean Conveyor Belt, and it takes 1,000 years for water to make a complete journey around the earth.

What is Scuba Diving?


Scuba diving is the sport of diving underwater with help from equipment that allows you to breathe while you’re submerged. The term SCUBA is an abbreviation for Self-Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus. Tanks that contain compressed air are used to deliver life-sustaining oxygen to your lungs while you’re deep underwater. The tanks contain a mixture of nitrogen and oxygen and are delivered through a breathing tube that attaches to your mouth. It takes training and practice to learn how to scuba dive safely, so taking lessons from a professional is highly recommended. Once you have the process down, scuba diving is a fun way to get out and explore the oceans in a fascinating way.

Species You Might Find While Diving


Scuba divers have an incredible opportunity to see a variety of unique marine fish and animals that most people will never see. There are hundreds of thousands, maybe millions of marine species out there, including unusual fish, coral, shellfish, and crustaceans. A few of the species you might find include sharks and manta rays. Depending on where you dive, you’ll have an incredible opportunity to discover a myriad of amazing coral species in a range of vibrant colors and unique shapes. Tropical waters are full of vibrant fish like clownfish, amazing octopi, and starfish in a wide variety of unusual shapes and sizes. You’ll also likely run into different crab species like the Japanese spider crab, the pea crab, and the coconut crab. The further out you go and the deeper you dive, the more variety of species you’ll see.


Please read Part II of this great article about the Ocean and Scuba Diving 

Clich Here -->  Part II  <-- Click Here

Tubbataha Reef - Philippines - Azores Liveaboard - June 4-11, 2022

Tubbataha Reef

The Philippines - A UNESCO World Heritage Site

Azores Liveaboard - June 4-11, 2022 - $3995 PPDO

The Philippines have opened their borders and now you can dive one of the best dive sites in the world... Tubbataha Reef.

Our charter gets you to this pristine location that has not seen scuba divers for more than 2 years. You can be among some of first the divers to experience this amazing location. The Tubbataha Natural Park, also known as the Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park, is a protected area of the Philippines located in the middle of the Sulu Sea and east of Palawan. The marine and bird sanctuary consists of two huge atolls and the smaller Jessie Beazley Reef covering a total area of 97,030 hectares.

   

   

Our Trip:

7 Nights, Check-in June 4, 2022 and Check-out June 11, 2022 - $3995 PPDO


Inclusions:

  • Deluxe stateroom or Owner's Suite (upgrade) accommodations
  • All meals & snacks, local soft drinks
  • Up to 5 dives per day including night diving - night dives are subject to conditions 
  • Social servings of local beer & rum and social servings of wine with dinner
  • Unlimited Nitrox valued at $204.00

 

Exclusions: 

  • Transfers to/from Manila and Puerto Princessa - Round trip transfers between Manila and Puerto Princessa are $244.00 per person.  Rate includes roundtrip domestic economy airfare between Manila and Puerto Princessa with 70 lbs. of checked luggage per person,  domestic terminal fees, private air-conditioned van between the international terminal and domestic terminal in Manila, round trip private air-conditioned transfers between Puerto Princessa Airport and the Azores,  personal airport ‘Meet & Greet’, and luggage assistance.  This rate is subject to change and applies when at least a minimum of 4 are traveling together on the same transfers otherwise a different transfer rate may apply. 
  • Marine Park Fee - $120.00 Marine park fees
  • Equipment Rental, onboard purchases, classes
  • Emergency fuel surcharges, if needed.

How to get to the Philippines and Tubbataha: Divers fly to Manila (MNL) then take a domestic flight to Puerto Princesa (PPR) located on the island of Palawan. Guests board the Atlantis Azores on Saturday at 5 pm. The boat leaves port around 7pm for the 10-hour journey to Tubbataha and arrives the next morning to start diving.


Tubbataha Dive Sites
Northern Tip of North Atoll
Fissures and crevices lead into it where nurse and whitetip reef sharks can be found resting during the day. Small manta rays, stingrays, and spotted eagle rays, together with numerous turtles have all been spotted. The wall has huge gorgonian fan corals, soft corals, and barrel sponges. Blacktip, whitetip, and grey reef sharks can normally be seen.
Southern End of North Atoll
Malayan, Wallstreet, and Amos Rock are the best dive sites. Photographers will enjoy these sites with Denise pygmy seahorses clinging to the sea fans. Scorpion fish, moray eels, and ghost pipefish are found. 
Northern Tip of South Atoll
Highlights include Black Rock, T Wreck, and Eiger Wall. You will lose count of the number of green and hawksbill turtles in the area and marble stingrays in the sand. Eagle rays and large grouper and giant trevally are seen.
Southern End of South Atoll
This area is known for its lighthouse and is home to famous dive sites Delsan Wreck and Black Rock. Hammerheads and occasional whale sharks are seen. Guitar sharks are found in the shallows.
Jessie Beazley Reef
On Jessie Beazley Reef you can see schools of bumphead parrotfish and napoleon wrasse. The shallow reefs are full of colorful tropical fish like the regal angelfish and titan triggerfish.
Southern End of North Atoll
The dive starts on a gentle slope that is covered in superb unmolested corals and ends with a wall covered with dramatic gorgonian fans where divers can often spot pygmy seahorses. If there’s current, you’ll come across a wide variety of large fish, including narrow-barred spanish mackerel, giant trevally, red snapper, napoleon wrasse, and giant groupers.

You can make this a Combo Trip
Add the Atlantis Dumaguete Resort - $2336 PPDO

    

7 Nights, Check-in May 28, 2022 and Check-out June 4, 2022  $2336 PPDO

  

Inclusions:

1)  7 nights deluxe room double occupancy, Free Upgrade to Garden Suites subject to availability

2)  All meals at Toko's Restaurant

3)  Coffee, hot tea, iced tea, and filtered water are complimentary throughout the day. Italian, other specialty coffees, and fresh juice are complimentary until 10am with breakfast and available for a fee thereafter.

4)  Up to 5 dives a day including night diving

5)  Apo Island Day Trip

6)  Unlimited internet access

7)  Unlimited Nitrox valued at $156.00


 Exclusions:

1)  Atlantis provides round-trip transfers between Manila and Dumaguete at a cost of $208.00 per person. Rate includes roundtrip domestic economy airfare between Manila and Dumaguete with 70 lbs. of checked luggage per person,  domestic terminal fees, private air-conditioned van between the international terminal and domestic terminal in Manila, round trip private air-conditioned transfers between Dumaguete Airport and resort, personal airport ‘Meet & Greet’, and luggage assistance. This rate is subject to change and applies when 4 to 15 guests are traveling together on the same transfer otherwise a different transfer rate may apply.


2)  The marine park fees are approximately $120.00. This estimate may be high as actual fees are charged by dive in 2021 at 210 pesos per day dive and 350 pesos for night dives.  Guests pay these fees at the resort on their personal bill at check-out. These fees are set by local municipalities and can change at any time.


3)  You can purchase additional day trips to Apo or Sumillon for $114.00. A day trip to the whale sharks at Oslob is $138.00. Rates are subject to change.

Philippine Islands Open to Travel - February 10, 2022

Philippine Islands Open to Travel

February 10, 2022

Great news! The Philippines are opening to international tourism February 10, 2022 and Atlantis will be open to welcome you back to the Philippines!

Starting February 10, 2022, the Philippines will allow entry of internationally arriving Filipinos and foreign nationals who are fully vaccinated and present a negative RT-PCR test taken within 48 hours prior to departure from their country of origin with no quarantine.


Dive Cuba - Avalon III and Avalon IV Liveaboards

Dive Cuba 

Jardines de la Reina 

Avalon III and Avalon IV Liveaboards


Avalon III Package

Low Season: May 28th - Oct 1st. $ 2,975.
High Season: Jan 1st - May 28th / Oct 1st - Dec 31st. $ 3,950.

Prices are per person and based on double occupancy.
Program runs Saturday through the following Saturday out of Jucaro Port.

The JA3 has 4 suites with balcony and 11 standard cabins for a total of 15 cabins with a max load of 30 passengers.

PACKAGE INCLUDES

- 7 nights accommodation aboard the Jardines Avalon III (JA3)
- 3 dives/day (18 dives + 1 night dive)
- All meals and snacks while onboard
- 6 beverages per day (including alcohol, soft drinks and bottled water) 

       

Avalon IV Package

Low Season: May 28th - Oct 1st. $ 2,499.
High Season: Jan 1st - May 28th / Oct 1st - Dec 31st. $ 3,300.

Prices are per person and based on double occupancy.
Program runs Saturday through the following Saturday out of Jucaro Port.

The JA4 has 4 full suites, 4 demi-suites, and 12 standard cabins for a total of 20 cabins with a max load of 40 passengers.

PACKAGE INCLUDES

- 7 nights accommodation aboard the Jardines Avalon IV (JA4)
- 2 dives/day (12 dives + 1 night dive)
- All meals and snacks while onboard
- 6 beverages per day (including alcohol, soft drinks and bottled water) 

      

    

DEMA Deals - Meridian Resort - Raja Ampat, Indonesia

DEMA Deals November 2021

* * Contact Us for Agent Discount * *

Meridian Adventure Dive Resort 

Raja Ampat, Indonesia


We have two amazing packages to Meridian Adventure Dive Resort in Raja Ampat
6 Nights, 7 Days or 9 Nights, 10 Days
6 Night Package  $1221 ppdo plus FREE BONUS 1 night and 2 dives - Save $278
9 Night Package  $2054 ppdo plus FREE BONUS 2 nights and 4 dives - Save $555

* * Single Occupancy Rates Available * * 

   

     


    

News from Manta Ray Bay Resort - Wishing on a Star

News from Manta Ray Bay Resort

Wishing on a Star

Greetings from Bill at Manta Ray Bay Resort on Yap, 

Hope all is well with you, your family, friends, and dive buddies. As for conquering the Covid-19 pandemic, the US is heading in the right direction, Europe seems to be getting things under control as well, while here on Yap we have about 40% of the population fully vaccinated. FSM president has set a 70% vaccination rate before stranded FSM citizens would be repatriated, however last week the first batch of stranded citizens were repatriated to Pohnpei. Although this by itself is a good sign, we do not anticipate reopening until early 2022.
 
With that knowledge I must announce that that MantaFest 2021 program is officially canceled. There is no way, in my opinion, that both the FSM Government and the Yap State Government are going to agree to open the borders anytime soon and even if they open, there will undoubtedly be all sorts of restrictions placed on arrivals that no one can affectively come for a vacation. 

This breaks my heart as I miss everyone, and I miss the diving. Who could ever believe that I have been unable to travel and there is no end in sight? It is an extraordinary situation that I am still not used to. Every morning, instead of going to the resort and diving with our friends from all around the world, I am checking the news hoping that the end of the tunnel will be insight soon. There is light, but no green light yet and that is very frustrating. I’m very sorry having to email this message, but it wouldn’t be responsible and fair towards you to give you hope that we could all be together for MantaFest this year. Even the changed dates in October are just not realistic anymore. It is sad but that is the reality we are forced to deal with.
 
Please keep following my blog. I hope you are enjoying reading the updates from our beautiful island as I certainly enjoy updating you. I am very much looking forward to the day I write the blog with the headline “Yes, we’re open again”.

Although our reopening date is unknown, please have a look at our “Grand Re-opening Specials”. As a MantaFest participant in 2022, you can benefit from our “Get 3 Extra Nights for Free” offer when booking our 7, 11 or 14-night MantaFest package.
 
Finally, please help us spread the word that Manta Ray Bay Resort & Yap Divers IS the dive resort to visit once things are back to normal again. Cast your vote in the Scuba Diving magazine’s World's Best Diving Resorts & Liveaboards Reader's Awards by following this link 
 
Friends, adopted family and buddies, please stay safe and healthy! My family and I, as well as our staff, cannot wait to have you as our guests again. 
 
All the best,
 
Bill, family & staff


                                                                                    

Damai I Liveaboard - Raja Ampat & Cenderawasih Bay - June 30-July 12, 2023

Damai I Liveaboard

Raja Ampat & Cenderawasih Bay

June 30-July 12, 2023

$500 Agent Discount 

Featuring U/W Photography Pro Brandi Mueller

 

* *  6 Cabins Available  * *

The ship has seven staterooms with a choice of single cabins, twins, doubles or two spacious master cabins. All cabins are furnished with either queen or king-sized beds, and ensuite toilets with showers. The ship has been designed with three large deck areas for relaxing in both the sun or shade and for enjoying relaxing massage and spa treatments. Specifically designed for divers, the vessel offers large dive stations with individual rinse tanks and a camera room with separate camera work stations. Damai offers three local dive guides and one Instructor on board throughout your trip. With only twelve guests, this is a good 4:1 guest to dive guide ratio. The ship has two custom-designed high-speed tenders to get all guests to dive sites comfortably. The signature service includes personalized dive station and rinse tank, camera room and storage space for equipment, ala-carte dining catering to all food requirements, laundry and massage service on board, and the ship has an 18-member crew.

 

 This trip will be featuring underwater photography pro Brandi Mueller to offer photo tips and sessions between dives. Bring your camera and be ready to shoot and learn..!


  


This trip departs Sorong and disembarks in Nabire. Start your trip in Raja Ampat, center of marine biodiversity in the world. Pass through Mapia, which sits closeby to a military base and contains underwater world that is pristine and untouched; no fisherman or tourism. Finish the trip in Cenderawasih Bay, famous for its resident population of whalesharks but there is also WWII history, beautiful reefs and endemic fish.


This 13 day, 12 night adventure embarks at Sorong and disembarks at Nabire, and includes stateroom accommodation, 3 meals a day, complimentary wine with dinner, nitrox for certified divers, unlimited diving with the dive day built around four daily dives, laundry service, airport transfers.


Cost: Stateroom Cabin - $5,550 per person double occupancy including taxes and a $500 DISCOUNT

FULL TRIP ITINERARY

Day 1: Arrive Sorong

Guests will arrive in Sorong and have time to get comfortable on the boat. Damai will travel west to Matan for a check-out dive.

No. of Dives: 1

 

Day 2: Penemu

The signature sites in Penemu are Barracuda Point; a seamount on the north point; Melissa's Garden; a beautiful example of a hard-coral plateau and Keruo Channel; drift along this colorful slope watching the seascape go by. The highlight of Penemu is a lagoon tour in the tender boats amongst these turquoise waters and limestone bays. For the energetic there is a short walk to the top of one the hills to be rewarded with an amazing view over the lagoon with Damai moored in the distance. Long Crossing to Farondi.

No. of Dives: 4

 

Day 3: Manta Sandy & Arborek

Manta Sandy is a signature site for experiencing the grace of Reef Mantas. They are frequent visitors to the cleaning stations dotted along this sandy channel. Feel free to explore the sand for small critters while you are waiting for an appearance. Arborek Jetty is part of a sloping reef in front of the island. There are schools of fish, excellent wide-angle photo opportunities under the jetty itself and good critter hunting to be done along the slopes. In the late afternoon take a stroll around the village on the island and maybe join in one of their soccer matches or buy a locally made sunhat.

No. of Dives: 4

 

Day 4: Kri & Dampier Straits

At the eastern end of the famous Dampier Strait there are many signature dive sites. Cape Kri is a sloping reef on the eastern end of the island of Kri; Blue Magic and Sardine reef are seamounts covered in schooling fish and cruising sharks and rays; Mioskon is a great spot for the endemic Wobbegong shark and Pontohi pygmy seahorses.

No. of Dives: 4

 

Day 5: Pulau Dua

Half-way between Raja Ampat and Cenderawasih bay we will make a stop in these small islands where remains of the Second World War were thrown into the sea making a small, but superb reefs where life concentrates in large numbers. Big school of yellow grunt, large napoleon fish or barramundis find shelter. In the evening, if the conditions so consider, we will go to the beach to see the leatherback turtle nesting.

No. of Dives: 2 or 3


Day 6 and 7: Mapia

The last atoll in Indonesian waters, very close to the border with Palau, too remote for fisherman to go, and protected by a small navy post. The combination of all these factors mean only one thing: superb diving: pristine waters, hard corals and drop-offs and a tremendous amount of fish. Rare opportunity to see reefs in the way they were many years ago, and a delight to all our senses.

No. of Dives: 3 or 4

 

Day 8: Pulau Manim

Manim is home to calm waters and 7 sunken landing craft left behind after WWII. These are in a variety of depths from 5 to 25m and are covered in a variety of hard and soft corals.

No. of Dives: 4

 

Day 9: Outer Atolls

The outer atolls of Cenderawasih Bay are some of fishiest sites of the area, located inside the National Park. Wild Fish Ridge and Spag point are two paricular favourites. It is here that we can view so many of the endemic species that led this to be called the Galapagos of the East.

No. of Dives: 4

 

Day 10: Tanjung Manguar / Pulau Nusir

Tanjung Mangguar is an extensive dive site with a wall on one side and a plateau of hard corals on the other. There are some magnificant sponges and lots of plump soft corals to add some colour to the reef. This is a good chance to see some of the endemic fish species and there is a school of resident blackfin barracuda.

No. of Dives: 4

 

Day 11 and 12: Teluk Wororomi

This is the Whale Shark bay and the local fishing platforms attract many of the ocean's largest fish. After local reporting is complete divers will be offered an open dive deck so that they may spend as much time as possible in the water with these amazing creatures. The Whale Sharks here are a resident population of pre-adolescents, mainly males, who are come to the platforms to feed on the small bait fish that sit in the nets that hang beneath. They are apparently unconcerned by divers and tirelessly circle back again and again to feed upon morsels of fish hand-fed to them by the fishermen who regard them as good luck.

No. of Dives: Unlimited dives / snorkelling

 

Day 13: Departure

Guests will be escorted to the airport in Nabire and assisted with check-in procedures, no doubt full of talk about the wonders of the most popular dive destination in the world.


    

Misool Eco Resort - Reflections from a Remote Island

Misool Eco Resort, Raja Ampat, Indonesia
Reflections from a Remote Island



Our little island has been a source of hope in the dark for so many. Throughout countless challenges, Misool has thrived, proving that sustainable tourism can protect the environment as well as the small coastal communities that depend upon these reefs. Survival against the odds is written into our DNA.

The Covid 19 crisis has developed at breakneck speed, and we’ve all had to adapt, fast. On 17 March, the mayor of Sorong issued a statement instructing Garuda Indonesia (as well as four other domestic airlines) to stop issuing tickets to foreigners traveling to Sorong until further notice. On the same day, the Jakarta Post reported that Indonesia would suspend its visa-free policy as of 20 March for one month. Sadly, we were forced to temporarily close the doors at Misool Resort. However, with a team of 250 full time employees, many of whom are supporting extended families on their wages, things cannot stop.