Liquid Diving Adventures

Bilikiki

Bilikiki

$4060 USD / 7 nights



Length: 38 meters / 125 feet
Beam: 7.3 meters / 24 feet
Divers: 20
Fuel Capacity: 7,000 liters
Engine: Doosan Marine 650 HP
Generators: 2 x Doosan Marine 45 KW
Nitrox $

Bilikiki
Bilikiki
Bilikiki
Bilikiki
Bilikiki
Bilikiki
Bilikiki
Bilikiki
Bilikiki
Bilikiki
Bilikiki
Bilikiki
Bilikiki
Bilikiki
Bilikiki
Bilikiki
Bilikiki
Bilikiki
The MV Bilikiki is a 38-meter steel hull luxury lveaboard that was first launched in 1989. The ship was the first full service liveaboard to sail the Solomon Islands. She is a large, stable vessel and consistently rated one of the best liveaboards in the world. The ship has 10 deluxe cabins, eight with a double bed and single bunk and two with twin single beds and no bunk. All cabins are airconditioned and have ensuite bathrooms. The ship features a large sundeck, a lounge and camera area, and spacious dive deck. The ship’s size and hull design make the ship stable and perfect for South Pacific seas.
The Bilikiki offers unlimited diving, with the dive day built around five daily dives. The ship does not hinder divers with a lot of restrictions, so within the bounds of common sense and safe dive practices, divers are permitted to set their own dive profiles. The dive masters are always available for those who need the guidance and pre-dive briefings are always offered to outline any special conditions.
Wreck dives are offered on every cruise and the number depends on the interests of the people on board. There are not many wrecks to choose from as most of them are too deep for recreational diving, even for very experienced divers. Those offered include The Ann in the Russell Islands, Japanese transports in Marovo Lagoon, the Japanese Mavis Seaplane and the famous WW II dump site called White Beach.
The ship does not operate in January and February when it tends to rain the most. These months are used this time for drydock maintenance and crew holidays. This ensures that the ship is always in top condition, that the crew is relaxed, and that customers will be guaranteed diving in the best seasons possible.
The Solomon Islands sit in the middle of the South Pacific and are part of the famous coral triangle. The Islands are located just a few degrees below the equator, the climate is tropical year-round and it is moderated by the sea air. Being tropical, it is generally sunny with frequent but short bursts of rain. Humidity is usually high, particularly inland, but is significantly lower on the smaller islands and aboard ship. This geographic area is home to some of the least visited scuba diving in the world. There is an amazing diversity of marine life, dive sites and experiences, all a short flight from Australia or Fiji. Bilikiki Cruises has been running liveaboard charters in the Solomon Islands for over 25 years and divers are assured of visiting the best dive sites the Islands offer.
The Bilikiki offers EAN 32% but does not support technical diving or rebreathers.
Text and photos courtesy of Bilikiki Cruises.



Dive Conditions

The Solomon Islands offer great diving conditions all year-round. The water temperatures are stable at 26-29°C/80-85°F. Visibility is generally around 15 meters/50 feet to 21 meters/60 feet or more. Also, on dives over deep water, you can expect a visibility that exceeds 30 meters/100 feet.
The Solomon Islands has some of the most pristine dive sites in the world. Unspoiled because of the remote location, there are not many divers or fishermen to put pressure on the reef and fish. The marine diversity of the Solomon Islands is without equal. Hundreds of world-class wrecks, dramatic caves, endless lush coral gardens, biodiversity to rival other Coral Triangle destinations like Indonesia, PNG, and the Philippines, little to no other dive boats around; the Solomon Islands are a scuba diving paradise.
Lying at the eastern edge of the Coral Triangle, the Solomons offer an impressive diversity of marine life, ranging from nudibranchs to cuttlefish and a wealth of other critters. Fish life is also abundant, including massive schools of trevally and barracuda, along with a vast assortment of colorful reef fish. Many reefs offer abundant healthy hard coral, sponges, fans, and soft coral. Underwater terrain is varied, including walls, slopes, coral gardens, and pinnacles, plus dramatic and highly photographic caverns.