Liquid Diving Adventures
Regions / Latin America / Ecuador / Bonita Galapagos

Bonita Galapagos

Bonita Galapagos

$2343 5D / 4N or $3514 7D / 6N Naturalist Rates



Built: Renovated in 2019
Construction: Steel Hull
Length: 31.5 meters / 103.3 feet
Beam: 10.5 meters / 34.5 feet
Cruise: 9 knots
Divers: 16
Engine: 2 x CAT 440 HP
Electricity: 110 / 220 VAC

Bonita Galapagos
Bonita Galapagos
Bonita Galapagos
Bonita Galapagos
Bonita Galapagos
Bonita Galapagos
Bonita Galapagos
Bonita Galapagos
Bonita Galapagos
Bonita Galapagos
Bonita Galapagos
Bonita Galapagos
Bonita Galapagos
Bonita Galapagos
Bonita Galapagos
Bonita Galapagos
Bonita Galapagos
Bonita Galapagos
Bonita Galapagos
M/Y Bonita was renovated in September 2019 and explores the Galapagos through three different itineraries. The yacht, a Lata Achievement Award runner-up, has eight crew members and one naturalist guide on board. The ship houses 16 passengers across nine cabins, including king, twin, and triple-sized cabins. All cabins include a private bathroom with hot and cold water, air conditioning, a telephone for internal communication on board, a speaker, and eco-friendly shower products. Located on the main deck is a living room with panoramic windows, a bar, a mini-video library, thematic books, and board games. The dining room is also on the main deck and serves three daily meals, including vegan and vegetarian options. The sundeck has 360-degree views of the ocean with lounge chairs, a sunroof, and cocktail tables.
The ship includes safety features such as two survival rafts for 15 passengers each, 50 life jackets, six lifebuoys, a flare gun, hand lights, smoke signals, and fire protection and prevention equipment. Rates include airport assistance, Galapagos transfers, accommodation, meals, visits, excursions, snorkel gear (mask, tube, wetsuit, and fins), kayaks, paddleboards, and unlimited drinks (water, coffee, tea, and soft drinks), and beach towels. Local flights to and from the Galapagos, the Galapagos National Park entrance fee, the Galapagos Transit card, alcoholic beverages, tips, local taxes, and travel insurance are not included.
Itinerary A, the northern route, lasts seven days and explores Santa Cruz, Santiago, Isabela, and Fernandina. Highlights of this trip include Dragon Hill, the only location in Santa Cruz where large land iguanas can be seen, and snorkeling right off the island in shallow, sheltered water. Here, there are large schools of fish and reef sharks. One of the last stops on this trip is at the Charles Darwin Station, where guests will learn about the biodiversity of the Galapagos and the efforts to preserve the native species. This trip is primarily hiking and snorkeling but includes panga rides, paddle boarding, and kayaking.
Itinerary B, the western route, lasts five days and visits Santa Cruz, Floreana, Espanola, San Cristobal, and Lobos Island. The first stop on this trip is the highlands, where Galapagos Giant turtles roam. A popular destination on this trip is Floreana island, where there is a vast history of German settlers in the early 1900s, including assassinations, disappearances, and unsolved mysteries. Visitors hike along the small beach and lava tunnel, then afterward, can snorkel in Post Office Bay, where there are sea turtles, rays, and Galapagos penguins. Near the end of the trip, guests will visit the Interpretation Center, which is dedicated to human life in the Galapagos. Afterward, they will hike near Kicker Rock, a towering volcanic formation.
Itinerary C, the southern route, lasts five days and explores Plazas, Santa Cruz, Genovesa, Santiago, Bartolome, and Seymour. Black Turtle Cove is a popular destination on this route as it is famous for its green sea turtles, shallow channels, small caves, and mangrove forests. This itinerary also stops at the highlands and Sullivan Bay, known for its preserved lava and snorkeling along the coral sand beach.
Narrative text and photographs courtesy of Galagents.



Dive Conditions

Many Galapagos Dive sites, especially those in the northern Islands of Wolf and Darwin, are characterized by the presence of the following diving conditions: Currents, Surge, Thermoclines, Cold water.
The best time to dive in Galapagos highly depends on what you'd like to see. The diving season in Galapagos is generally divided into two categories: Whale Shark Season (June-November) and Manta Season (December-May) when it's slightly warmer. During the warmer Manta Season the schools of hammerheads are generally larger and giant manta rays may be found off Isabela island.
December - May: This is the warm season in the Galapagos with the highest water and air temps. Brief afternoon rain showers are common but expect the tropic sun to reappear after the rain. Water temperature is 70-86F (21-30C) with some cooler thermoclines at depth. The northern islands are generally colder. Visibility stays between 40-100 feet (12-33 meters).
June - November: This season is known as the guarua and is cooler with frequent mist and overcast days. Winds can create rougher seas at times. Water temperature is 60-75F (16-24C). While colder, the trade-off is the rich currents bringing nutrients into the islands, resulting in more abundant marine life. Visibility is slightly less as a result.
Galapagos diving conditions can be challenging. Currents are moderate to strong and may require you to grab hold of rocks below the surface so you don't drift away. Surges may create difficulties during your safety stops. The average visibility is 10 - 21m (30 - 70ft), but can be less.
June to December. However, September November is the best time to see the most wildlife, but the waters will be colder. The water for diving is cold all year-round, but even COLDER during this time of year, with thermoclines as well. Wetsuits of 7mm are recommended, as well as a hood and gloves.
Divers must follow their Dive Master and Galapagos Marine Reserve rules at all times. Divers must stick with the group and their Dive Master at all times, remain with their buddies, and ascend in pairs. Safety Stops are obligatory for all Galapagos dives.