Liquid Diving Adventures

Sea Hunter

Sea Hunter

$5795 USD / 10 nights



Construction: Steel hull with teak deck
Length: 36 meters / 115 feet
Beam: 8.1 meters / 26 feet
Cruise: 9.5 knots
Divers: 20
Fuel Capacity: 20,000 US gallons
Fresh Water: 15,000 US gallons
Engine: Twin GM 16V92 / 1200 total hp
Electricity: 110 / 220 VAC
Generators: GM 6-71 75kw
Nitrox Free
Tech and/or Rebreathers Supported

Sea Hunter
Sea Hunter
Sea Hunter
Sea Hunter
Sea Hunter
Sea Hunter
Sea Hunter
Sea Hunter
Sea Hunter
Sea Hunter
Sea Hunter
Sea Hunter
Sea Hunter
Sea Hunter
Sea Hunter
Sea Hunter
Sea Hunter
Sea Hunter
Sea Hunter
The Sea Hunter is a 115-foot ship that has been redesigned and configured as a purpose-built liveaboard vessel. Sea Hunter combines the large platform and powerful mechanical systems of an oil industry workboat with the comfortable and relaxed interior of a modern yacht. She was specifically designed and built for long-range expeditions to destinations like Cocos and Malpalo islands.
This spacious boat is everything that a serious diver or photographer could wish for, including individual gear storage, private camera and strobe storage with 110 and 220-volt AC power, zero-speed stabilizers, and a private washer and dryer for client’s towels. Her roominess and user-friendliness has introduced adventure divers, as well as professional photographers and cinematographers, to an entirely new level of live-aboard facility.
Because of the remote location, Cocos Island can only be reached by liveaboard and the unspoiled beauty makes it one of the top 10 places to dive in the world. The waters surrounding Cocos Island are a playground for large pelagics including hammerhead sharks, eagle rays, and whales.
Located in the Eastern Tropical Pacific, 300 miles southwest of Cabo Blanco, Costa Rica, lies the Cocos Island Marine Park. A rugged yet incredibly verdant island, this World Heritage Site is the spectacularly beautiful crown jewel of Costa Rica's many National Parks.
Cocos Island was formed during a volcanic upheaval about two-and-a-half million years ago. Its landmass is punctuated by four mountain peaks, the highest of which is Cerro Iglesias, at 2,080 feet or 634 meters above the sea. There are only two bays with safe anchorages and sandy beaches: Chatham is located on the northeast side and Wafer Bay is on the northwest.
The Sea Hunter offers nitrox and supports technical diving and rebreathers.
Text and photographs courtesy of the Undersea Hunter fleet

Dive Conditions

Costa Rica- Diving seasons in Costa Rica can be split into rainy season (May to November) and dry season (December to April). Each season brings its own advantages. Depending on the area, visibility usually ranges from 15-30 metres/50-100 feet. June through September generally brings the best visibility. Costa Rica has a tropical and subtropical climate and has a year-round diving season. The water temperature from January to March hovers around 27°C/80F and around 28°C/82F from July to September.
Cocos Island - Don't expect colorful reefs and white sandy beaches. Coco's Island is a volcanic island emerging from the ocean, with steep walls, huge submerged rocks, and a few hard corals. Above water, the land is mountainous with rainforests and the climate is humid and tropical.
Belonging to Costa Rica, Cocos Island is the mecca for divers looking for big animals, open ocean, and advanced diving. Sharks are the main attraction. Cocos is not a place with pretty corals or reefs. It is a gorgeous, uninhabited island, approximately 5 x 2 miles (8 x 3 km) in size. The bottom is a sloping rocky substrate without a lot of colors.
What divers do experience is amazing marine life - prolific shark populations including reef whitetip and scalloped hammerheads, plus a chance of many other species. There is also great schooling fish action, and a good chance of seeing true pelagics like wahoo, tuna, and even billfish. If you are comfortable with deep (100ft) nitrox diving in open oceans, and the possibility of swell, strong currents and low vis, Cocos island can be the apex dive trip of your dive career. It is not a place for non-divers or novice divers. Advanced certification and experience are recommended.
Water temperatures at Cocos Island in June/July is usually 81F degrees at all depths. It stays from 80-82F during the summer. The water can get much colder, down in the lower 70s in the winter. Thermoclines are common, and deep down can get into the 60s. Visibility in June through July is usually 50-70ft. Visibility can be variable but 30-50ft is normal, with even better visibility from January through May.