Liquid Diving Adventures
Regions / Asia / Indonesia / Coralia

Coralia

Coralia

$3,745 USD / 7 nights per person - Lower Deck Cabin / $4,060 USD 7 nights - Master Cabin



Construction: Classic Phinisi
Length: 48 meters / 157 feet
Beam: 9.1 meters / 30 feet
Draft: 3.75 meters / 12 feet
Cruise: 9-11 knots
Divers: 16
Fuel Capacity: 15 tons
Fresh Water: 10,000 liter + desalination unit
Engine: 2 Mitsubishi Marine Engines 560HP & 360HP
Electricity: 220 Volt, 50 Hertz avalaible for cabins & camera room
Generators: 1-Yanmar Marine 60 KW & 1-Yanmar Marine 40 KW
Nitrox Free
WIFI Available

Schedules & Availability


Date

spaces

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25 NOV2022
9 nights
Trip 112 - Raja Ampat (Misool & Dampier Strait)
1 available space
USD 4815.-
1 available space

Departure/Arrival

embark:
25 Nov 2022
Sorong
disembark:
04 Dec 2022
Sorong

Prices & Availability

Master
Main Deck
USD 5220.-
fully booked
Master
Upper Deck
USD 5220.-
fully booked
Double
Lower Deck
USD 4815.-
fully booked
Twin
Lower Deck
USD 4815.-
1 space only female

Surcharges payable with booking

Port Fuel and Park Fees
USD
295.-
 Booking Request
07 DEC2022
11 nights
Trip 113 - Raja Ampat (Misool, Dampier Strait & Wayag)
3 available spaces
USD 5885.-
3 available spaces

Departure/Arrival

embark:
07 Dec 2022
Sorong
disembark:
18 Dec 2022
Sorong

Prices & Availability

Master
Main Deck
USD 6380.-
fully booked
Master
Upper Deck
USD 6380.-
fully booked
Double
Lower Deck
USD 5885.-
2 spaces
Twin
Lower Deck
USD 5885.-
1 space only female

Surcharges payable with booking

Port Fuel and Park Fees
USD
295.-
 Booking Request
15 JAN2023
7 nights
Trip 116 - Raja Ampat (Dampier Strait & Wayag)
1 available space
USD 3850.-
1 available space

Departure/Arrival

embark:
15 Jan 2023
Sorong
disembark:
22 Jan 2023
Sorong

Prices & Availability

Master
Main Deck
USD 4375.-
fully booked
Master
Upper Deck
USD 4375.-
fully booked
Double
Lower Deck
USD 3850.-
fully booked
Twin
Lower Deck
USD 3850.-
1 space only male

Surcharges payable with booking

Port Fuel and Park Fees
USD
295.-
 Booking Request
07 APR2023
11 nights
Trip 123 - Raja Ampat, Banda Islands, Ambon
2 available spaces
USD 6050.-
2 available spaces

Departure/Arrival

embark:
07 Apr 2023
Sorong
disembark:
18 Apr 2023
Ambon

Prices & Availability

Master
Main Deck
USD 6875.-
fully booked
Master
Upper Deck
USD 6875.-
fully booked
Double
Lower Deck
USD 6050.-
fully booked
Twin
Lower Deck
USD 6050.-
2 spaces
1 space only male
1 space only female

Surcharges payable with booking

Port Fuel and Park Fees
USD
325.-
 Booking Request
23 APR2023
10 nights
Trip 124 - Maumere, Alor & Komodo
1 available space
USD 5500.-
1 available space

Departure/Arrival

embark:
23 Apr 2023
Maumere
disembark:
03 May 2023
Labuan Bajo

Prices & Availability

Master
Main Deck
USD 6250.-
fully booked
Master
Upper Deck
USD 6250.-
fully booked
Double
Lower Deck
USD 5500.-
fully booked
Twin
Lower Deck
USD 5500.-
1 space only male

Surcharges payable with booking

Port Fuel and Park Fees
USD
225.-
 Booking Request
next trips

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Offered through Papua Explorers, Coralia Liveaboard is devoted to sustainability and conservation. The ship is 48 meters long with a sun deck at the top and open-air dining and living areas on the upper and main decks. Packages include full board accommodations, beverages (soft drinks, water, tea, coffee), up to 4 dives per day, free nitrox, and airport transfers on days of trips.
There are eight spacious cabins onboard: four master cabins, two double cabins, and two twin cabins. The master cabins are located on the main and upper decks, and each has access to a private deck. The double cabins feature a double and twin bed located on the lower deck. The twin cabins are also on the lower deck and have two twin beds. All accommodation features a private bathroom, AC, towels, a hairdryer, eco-friendly hygiene products, free wifi, and a safe. The restaurant offers three daily meals and snacks prepared by a Bali-trained chef. Guests can choose from fresh local and international dishes and vegan and vegetarian options. All meals are served buffet-style, with one barbeque night. Water, coffee, and tea are complimentary. The ship was built with diving in mind, as there is a shaded dive deck with warm showers, a changing room, hangers, storage space, and towels. There is also a camera room on the main deck with individual camera stations that includes a rinsing basket. Dives are done in groups with four guests and one dive guide. Night dives and 12-liter nitrox are available on Coralia.
Itineraries include an exploration of Raja Ampat, where guests will visit destinations like Misool, the Dampier Strait, Wayag or Batana, and Kawe. These trips explore the Coral Triangle, famous for its biodiversity. Dive experiences include exploring the reefs, spotting sharks, and night diving at the Dampier Strait. Other trips include Ambon, Banda, and the Forgotten Islands, where guests explore muck diving destinations and visit Banda Island museums and rocky volcanic sites. This trip also visits dive sites along the dramatic walls in North and South Terband, where soft and hard corals are found.
Besides diving, activities such as bird watching, hiking on secluded islands, kayaking, paddleboarding, and trips to the onboard spa are also available. The Coralia offers nitrox but tec diving and rebreathers are not supported. Dive groups include 4 divers per divemaster, 4:1.
Narrative text and photographs courtesy of the Coralia liveaboard and Papua Explorers Resort.



Dive Conditions

Conditions can make or break your trip. Temperature, visibility and the current vary greatly across this expansive country. Be sure to check the conditions of each destination you’re planning to dive before you leave. Diving is excellent year-round, but the best time is from May to September. Monsoon season is from December to June. Visibility may not be as good during the monsoon, however, certain locations like the Komodo Islands are a diver’s dream during this time due to an influx of mantas.
Most of Indonesia can be dived year-round with March to October being the most popular time of year to dive. This period of time marks the dry season in most parts of the country, with the exception of some dive areas like Ambon and southern Raja Ampat where most rainfall occurs in May/June to October/September due to the southern monsoon. It's best to visit these areas in the months of November to April for optimal dive conditions.
Generally speaking, Indonesia's climate is almost entirely tropical, with May to September as the dry season, and October to April the rainy season, and with heavier rainfall from December through February. However, the opposite might be true for certain dive areas in Indonesia like Raja Ampat and Ambon, and the best time of year to visit Indonesia really depends on where you intend to stay in the country.
The water temperatures remain quite consistent through the country, hovering at 26°-29°C (82°- 85°F) year-round. Typically, you won't need anything more than a 3-5mm wetsuit, or even a skinsuit. However, the diving conditions and difficulty in Indonesia hugely vary, depending on where and when you dive in the country.
Ambon Bay, Maluku – world class muck diving. Critters that can be seen here include rhinopias, frogfish, ghost pipefish, lots of juvenile fish, stonefish, mandarin fish, nudibranchs, harlequin and coleman shrimps, wonderpus, mimic and flamboyant cuttlefish, and even the much-sought-after psychedelic frogfish.
Alor, East Nusa Tenggara – the hidden gem. This off-the-beaten-path dive destination offers a mix of both world-class wide-angle and macro sites. Pristine coral reefs, steep walls, sloping muck sites--the diving in Alor is really diverse and would please the most discerning diver and underwater photographer.
Banda Sea, Maluku – sea snakes and hammerheads. Most of the diving around the Banda Sea involves excellent wall dives, and great macro sites, but the biggest draw is probably the resident sea snakes at Manuk and Gunung Api islands.
Bali – wrecks and mola molas. Unique critters, fascinating wrecks, beautiful walls, colorful corals, excellent muck dives, huge schools of fish, pelagics--Bali has it all. Technical diving and freediving are also possible in Bali with a good number of reputable dive operations.
Derawan Islands, Borneo – manta rays and whalesharks. Derawan is a remote group of islands in East Kalimantan (East Borneo), and is home to one of the three jellyfish lakes known to men, with the other two located in Palau and Misool Island in Raja Ampat.
Komodo, East Nusa Tenggara – drift dives and world class reefs. Komodo National Park is a group of volcanic islands with over 5,700 giant lizards known as Komodo dragons. This UNESCO World Heritage Site also hosts a world-class scuba diving scene. Imagine drift dives with colorful corals in various formations teeming with marine life, big and small. Divers can see big schools of fish pretty much year-round, as well as eagle and manta rays.
Lembeh, North Sulawesi – muck diving capital. Known as the world's capital for muck diving, Lembeh Strait in North Sulawesi offers second-to-none macro biodiversity. The number species that you can cross off your list within a week of diving Lembeh is staggering.
Manado and Bunaken, North Sulawesi – wall dives and reefs. Manado Bay offers a mix of great muck and reef sites, treating divers to unique critters like mimic octopus and flamboyant cuttlefish, as well as various seahorses, squid, nudibranchs, and frogfish.
Raja Ampat, West Papua – the holy grail of Indonesia. Alongside Kaimana Regency and Triton Bay in the south, and Cenderawasih Bay in the east, Raja Ampat archipelago makes up a massive area, collectively known as the Bird’s Head Seascape. Divers can visit the Raja Ampat area many times in their lifes and discover something new each time.
Wakatobi, South East Sulawesi – beautiful coral reefs. Wakatobi's reefs are extremely healthy and offer unique large coral formations, various sea fans, and sponges which are overflowing with marine life. The underwater topography is no less unique, featuring various walls, ridges, and overhangs. While it's not the place for large pelagics, eagle rays and reef sharks can typically be seen.