Liquid Diving Adventures

Latest News & Updates

The Unspoiled Solomon Islands

The Unspoiled Solomon Islands


So near and yet... A group of Pacific islands north-east from Australia, just close enough to Papua New Guinea to fly over and borrow a cup of sugar, and just a three-hour flight from Brisbane, the Solomon Islands beckon the adventurous traveler who doesn’t need to be coddled.

The Solomon Islands is a sovereign nation of six major islands and over 900 smaller islands in the South Pacific. The islands have many WWII-era sites. Guadalcanal, a province and one of the archipelago’s largest islands, honors fallen Allied soldiers at its U.S. War Memorial. Guadalcanal is also home to the nation’s capital, Honiara. The capital city has a bustling Central Market that is famous for the islands’ produce and traditional handicrafts.


Solomon Islanders share a diverse history and cultural background. The population is mostly of Melanesian descent but is also made up of Polynesians, Micronesians, Chinese and Europeans. There are approximately 550,000 people living in the Solomons and about 70,000 live in the capital city. The islands have been settled since at least some time between 30,000 and 28,800 BCE, with later waves of migrants, notably the Lapita people, mixing and producing the modern indigenous Solomon Islanders population. 

 

Located in the Coral Triangle, the Solomon Islands are known for their diverse aquatic life, ranging from macro to pelagic life. In fact, roughly 75% of the ocean’s coral species are found in the Coral Triangle. As an emerging tourist destination, Solomon’s reefs are untouched, and the waters generally aren't overcrowded with divers.


Leru Cut


Leru Cut is one of Solomon’s most famous dive sites, known for its canyon that sits high above the water and dives deep into the ocean. Ideal diving time is between 11 am and 2 pm as the sun trickles into the cut and illuminates the underwater vegetation, making this a stunning stop for photographers. Divers can search for hidden nudibranchs and octopi or swim over to the nearby wall teeming with sharks, turtles, and schools of triggerfish. The cut can only be accessed by liveaboard and is located in the Eastern Russell Islands.

 

The history of World War II is apparent in Solomon’s waters, with wrecks and artifacts resting on the sandy bottom. Six months of warfare took place in the Pacific, resulting in nearly 70 ships and almost 700 planes being destroyed. Currently, these wrecks live on as habitats for marine life and as sites for divers to explore. In Wickham Lagoon, there are multiple unidentified Japanese cargo vessels. In the Florida Islands, there are several Japanese and US aircraft wrecks. Hai Island’s site, White Beach, named after a US military code, has a reef constructed of trucks, tractors, bulldozers, and ammo. The artificial reef is now home to jawfish, archerfish, harlequin shrimp, and more. This site is ideal for wreck fanatics, history buffs, and macro lovers. 


 

Off the coast of the Florida Islands are several exciting dives like the northern wall, sandy channel, and two abandoned wrecks with countless glassfish, anthias, and damsels. There is a coral garden with giant clams, peacock mantis shrimp dens, and cuttlefish on the eastern side. The Devil’s Highway is close to the shore and is home to giant manta rays. Near this manta haven is a shallow reef where visitors often drift as they experience the pelagic life feed and swim. Divers looking for a thrill can visit Mary Island and feel the rumbles from the underwater volcano. Barracuda, jacks, and sharks are often spotted at this site. 

 

Visitors can choose from a selection of resorts and liveaboard for their Solomon diving adventures. The Solomon Islands are ideal for divers looking for a quiet, pristine experience, with countless caves, wrecks, and reefs to explore. We recommend the Bilikiki liveaboard for an amazing dive adventure in the Solomon Islands.


     

5 Reasons to Choose a Liveaboard

5 Reasons to Choose a Liveaboard

1. Excellent value for money

 

Who doesn’t appreciate good value for their money? Organizing a diving trip on your own can be costly. In most cases, you pay for your hotel, transport, food, equipment rental, and diving separately. These things can add up, leaving the most passionate divers wishing they’d taken up snorkeling at their local beach instead. One of the most attractive aspects of liveaboard diving is just how cost-effective it is. Liveaboard charters include all your dives, accommodation, and meals. These dives will be in some of the most exotic sites that the world has to offer. You also get your air refills, meals, snacks, and drinks included in the cost, and many liveaboards offer free nitrox. 



2. More dives each day

 

If you love scuba diving as much as we do, then you will want to make the most of being in the water. With 3-4 dives a day you’ll have plenty of time to explore the beauties of the underwater world. Your itinerary could look something like this: a refreshing, early morning dive to start your day, a mid-morning channel dive to build your appetite for lunch, an exciting wreck dive in the afternoon, and an adrenaline-fuelled night dive with nurse sharks to finish off the day. What diver doesn’t love having more dives, more locations, and more experiences all in one day?



3. Pristine dive sites


The more accessible a dive spot is, the more divers you’ll usually find on the reef. Too many divers on one site can result in poor visibility and damaged reef systems. These things can impact the enjoyment of your diving experience. Nobody wants to go on a dive vacation just to see few fish and poor visibility. Many of the dive destinations our dive buddies experience are only accessible by liveaboard boats. The result is that the dive sites are pristine with an abundance of undisturbed marine critters to share your dive. With multiple dives a day there is plenty for you to explore. We offer trips around the world including the Red Sea, the Maldives, the Galapagos, the Socorro Islands, Sea of Cortez, Indonesia, the Solomon Islands, Fiji, Truk Lagoon, and Palau to name a few.



4. Hassle-Free Diving


From the joy that comes once you have made that giant stride and submerged yourself in the water, most divers will agree that diving’s downsides take place above the water. Thankfully, liveaboards save you from these challenges. On most boats, the crew will help you get out of the water and will also help remove your fins and BCD. The crews make sure you don’t have to lift finger before or after your dive. And You will wake up on top of your next dive site. Plus, being on a liveaboard boat takes away the hassle of getting between site locations. You can relax in plush surroundings, while the captain navigates to your next inspirational dive site.



5. Comfortable and flexible surroundings


On a liveaboard, the crew will ensure you enjoy your fourth dive as much as your first. Wouldn’t it be better to spend time between dives relaxing? Wouldn’t you rather spend time talking to your buddy about the experience that you just shared? Liveaboards are designed to make your time out of the water as memorable as your time within it. Whether you are swimming with a whale shark or sitting on a spacious deck, sipping a beverage, and admiring the sunset, the whole experience is designed to be easy and comfortable. Can you think of anything better than falling asleep listening to the sounds of the sea while drifting off in a remote corner of the world? Waking up on top of your next dive site?




                                                                               

Six Awesome Liveaboard Destinations

Six Awesome Liveaboard Destinations

 

Liveaboards provide a one-of-a-kind experience for travelers looking to fully submerge themselves into a diving adventure. Guests are able to spend a week (or more!) filling their days with diving and their nights watching the sunset across the open water. Liveaboards can provide all of the same luxuries as a typical on land resort such as spa treatments, snorkeling, gourmet meals, and excursions. Here are our picks of some of the six best destinations for a liveaboard vacation.


1) Galápagos Islands - Ecuador


                                          


The Galapagos Islands are scattered across the equator and have warm weather year-round. While diving in the Pacific waters surrounding the islands is great all year, December to May is the warmest season with the calmest waters and highest visibility. Divers during this season most often see hammerhead sharks and manta rays. July to November is ideal for more advanced divers hoping for more intense, choppier waters. Although the ocean is generally a bit colder during this season, it is known for nutrient-rich water that attracts all kinds of sea life, specifically whale sharks. Diving in the Galapagos is done on liveaboards from tenders or Zodiacs, and guests are able to have a unique experience living out on the open waters. 


2) Socorro Island - Mexico


                                              

Socorro Island is the largest island in the Revillagigedo Archipelago and is famous for its vibrant wildlife, both on and off the shore. The volcanic island does not have an airport, making it a popular spot for liveaboards. The diving season lasts from November to May as that is when the water is at its calmest. Throughout this season, divers often get to see hammerhead sharks, manta rays, whale sharks, and humpback whales. From January to March, there are even frequent sightings of bottlenose dolphins. In addition to these, sightings of silky sharks, Galapagos sharks, whitetip reef sharks, and silvertip sharks are possible as well. Getting to the Socorros requires an open ocean crossing about 22 hours from Cabo San Lucas, Baja California.


3) Raja Ampat - Indonesia


                                      


Located off the coast of Bird’s Head Peninsula in West Papua, Raja Ampat is an Indonesian archipelago that is known for its extensive biodiversity. The islands form part of the Coral Triangle — an area known as a home to 76% of known coral species. In Raja Ampat’s waters, there is countless marine life and stunning coral reefs to see. The most popular sights include manta rays, reef sharks, walking sharks, turtles, nudibranchs, and so much more. Diving in Raja Ampat is ideal from October to April as it has the driest weather with calm seas that make for smooth liveaboard sailing. The clear waters consistently have a visibility of 80-100 ft all year long, which is perfect for spotting even the smallest of critters. 


4) Tubbataha Reef - Philippines


                                      

Tubbataha Reef is a protected marine park in the Philippines’ Sula Sea. It is known for being a nesting ground for green sea turtles and is made up of a northern atoll, southern atoll, and the Jessie Beazley Reef.  Visitors can only explore the clear waters from a liveaboard as it is located over 10 hours away from land. The diving season takes place from mid-March to mid-June as that is when the water is at its calmest and clearest with a visibility of up to 114 feet. The reef is known for its vast biodiversity as it is reported to have over 1,200 species — 181 of which are threatened.


5) Solomon Islands - Oceania Pacific

                                        


Diving in the Solomon Islands is perfect for visitors hoping for a more private, secluded experience with untouched reefs. There are nearly a thousand islands in the archipelago, and almost all of them are uninhabited. The water temperature is consistently in the low to high 80s, making it comfortable to dive in year-round. However, January through April is monsoon season, which brings the greatest amounts of wind and rain that could disrupt diving. What makes the Solomon Islands so unique is that their waters hold a time capsule that sends divers back to World War II with its numerous plane and shipwrecks at various depths. In addition to these one-of-a-kind wrecks, divers can also explore reefs, walls, slopes, pinnacles, and more. Visitors can choose to spend their time in the Solomon Islands on a liveaboard or from a resort on land.


6) Chuuk Lagoon - Micronesia


                                       


Chuuk Lagoon is a mountainous island that was once a former Japanese naval base during the second world war. The island’s history has been kept alive in its own waters with its array of sunken treasure, submerged ships teeming with marine life, and even human remains. Divers in the Lagoon’s Pacific waters get to explore part of this history, and often even find artifacts such as ammunition or guns. The wrecks vary in their depth, making them accessible for just about any level of diver. The temperature is consistently warm year-round; however, December to April is ideal due to the lack of rainfall and wind during this season. 

Bilikiki Liveaboard - Solomon Islands - August 17 - September 27, 2024

Bilikiki Liveaboard

Solomon Islands Adventure

NEW DATES   August 17 - September 27, 2024  NEW DATES

* *  Only 8 Berths Available  * *


The Bilikiki has 10 deluxe cabins, eight with a double bed and single bunk and two with twin single beds and no bunk. All cabins are air-conditioned and have their own ensuite bathroom. The ship has a large sundeck, comfortable lounge, camera area, and spacious dive deck. Her large size and a steel hull that was built for South Pacific seas are two main reasons why you will find this ship one of the most spacious and comfortable vessels that you have experienced.


Our unique package offers 11-nights deluxe cabin accommodation on the fabulous Bilikiki liveaboard where we will visit the Russell Islands, Mary Island, and the Florida Islands to dive the stunning reefs of these areas, and we also visit the Marovo Lagoon area of the Western Province. On this unique adventure, we will stop at villages to experience native singing and dancing and get a taste of the traditional customs and life. We will also see the famous wood carvings of the area, and have an opportunity to buy hand-made carvings and other traditionally made items. 


       

            

          

This adventure includes deluxe cabin accommodation, 3 meals a day (plus snacks, water, coffee, espresso, tea), nitrox for certified divers, and unlimited diving with the dive day built around five daily dives.


Cost: $6,930 per person double occupancy includes standard package, nitrox, and taxes. Ask for our agent special offer...!

Previous Posts