Liquid Diving Adventures

Latest News & Updates

CDC Guidelines for US Travel - January 26, 2021 - COVID-19 Viral Tests

CDC Expands Negative COVID-19 Test Requirement 

All Air Passengers Entering the United States

Effective January 26, 2021

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is expanding the requirement for a negative COVID-19 test to all air passengers entering the United States.  Testing before and after travel is a critical layer to slow the introduction and spread of COVID-19. This strategy is consistent with the current phase of the pandemic and more efficiently protects the health of Americans.

Variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus continue to emerge in countries around the world, and there is evidence of increased transmissibility of some of these variants.  With the US already in surge status, the testing requirement for air passengers will help slow the spread of the virus as we work to vaccinate the American public.

Before departure to the United States, a required test, combined with the CDC recommendations to get tested again 3-5 days after arrival and stay home for 7 days post-travel, will help slow the spread of COVID-19 within US communities from travel-related infections. Pre-departure testing with results known and acted upon before travel begins will help identify infected travelers before they board airplanes.

Air passengers are required to get a viral test (a test for current infection) within the 3 days before their flight to the U.S. departs, and provide written documentation of their laboratory test result (paper or electronic copy) to the airline or provide documentation of having recovered from COVID-19. Airlines must confirm the negative test result for all passengers or documentation of recovery before they board. If a passenger does not provide documentation of a negative test or recovery, or chooses not to take a test, the airline must deny boarding to the passenger.

Socorro Islands - Mexico - Only by Liveaboard!

Socorro Islands - Mexico - Only by Liveaboard!

Mexico’s Revillagigedo Islands are synonymous with liveaboards and big-animal encounters. The archipelago lies about 300 miles off the southern tip of Baja California, requiring a 22-hour transit from Cabo San Lucas.



Four uninhabited volcanic islands make up the Revillagigedos: Socorro, Clarion, San Benedicto, and Roca Partida. They raise up from sea level from 100 to 3,800 feet out of the water from the seafloor, creating exceptional walls, pinnacles and sheer drop-offs that act as cleaning and feeding stations for oceanic mantas and half a dozen shark species, including mass aggregations of scalloped hammerheads.

 

Revillagigedos is an oasis in the middle of the eastern Pacific. The four islands sit at the convergence of the cool California Current flowing from the north and the warmer North Equatorial Current, creating an ideal spot for nutrients to rise from the deep and attract passing pelagics. This makes Revilla a hotspot for manta rays, humpback whales, whale sharks, dolphins, hammerheads, Galapagos sharks—nearly every variety of hungry traveler.



The Revillagigedos are part of a unique chain with amazing undersea volcanic mounds. Because of the remote nature, there’s just not a lot of pressure on the sites.

 

Cabo Pierce, the Aquarium, and El Canyon dive sites offer the chance to see just about any big animals you can imagine—humpback whales, pacific bottlenose dolphins, whale sharks, the list goes on.

 

Because these are important waterways for endangered megafauna, the islands were deemed a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2016, and a year later were established as the Revillagigedo National Park. Even though they’re remote, they’re patrolled by the local government to prevent illegal fishing.

 

Because the archipelago is a national park and UNESCO World Heritage Site, certain protective measures are in place. Night diving, solo diving, and diving in the blue are not offered for safety reasons. Also, reef hooks, knives, dive lights not connected to cameras, and gloves are not permitted. In order to manage the number of divers on each site, liveaboards coordinate the timing of their dives. Because of this, if there are several boats at a site, they may limit the number of dives per day to three. The park has a set limit on the number of liveaboards that can visit, but flexibility is key in these parts.


Tubbataha Reefs - Philippines - Only by Liveaboard!

Tubbataha Reefs - Philippines - Only by Liveaboard!

North Atoll and South Atoll


Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park is a marine protected area and world-renowned scuba diving site. It is home to more than 1,200 marine species, including sea grasses and algae, corals, sharks, rays, fishes, sea turtles, seabirds and marine mammals. The Park is an exceptionally healthy reef ecosystem and its strong no-take level protections ensure this biodiversity stays safe.


Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park is an important asset for global conservation, as 181 of the species found there are threatened to some degree, from Vulnerable to Critically Endangered. Tubbataha is made up of two atolls dense with biodiversity that serve as nesting grounds for endangered turtles and more than 100 species of birds. It is a breeding and rookery ground for many species of migratory and resident seabirds, including the Critically Endangered Christmas Island frigatebird, as well as the Endangered green sea turtles and Critically Endangered hawksbill sea turtle.


Because it’s so far from land, Tubbataha only started to feel the effects of human exploitation in the 1980’s. Recognizing its great biodiversity value, the government of the Philippines first protected the area through legislation in 1988. Protective regulations have only been strengthened since then, leading to international recognition including its Platinum Blue Park award. This UNESCO World Heritage Site might be your best bet to see whale sharks, manta rays, hawksbill turtles, hammerheads, spinner dolphins and schooling gray reef sharks all in one day.

 

Diver’s Notes

Average Water Temperature: 25° C to 29° C / 78°-85° F

Visibility: 12-36 meters / 40-120 feet

Seasonal Access Only: March thru June 

Liveaboards we offer: Seadoors, Philippine Siren, Infiniti, Atlantis Azores, Solitude One.

Five Popular Dive Sites

·      Amos Rock, also known as Southwest Rock, is one of the popular scuba dive sites found on the North Atoll of. It features a breathtaking wall that is covered in a variety of corals, including whip corals, and you will also find massive gorgonian fans along it as well. A variety of large fish, including groupers, snappers, mackerels, and even Napoleon wrasses are also found drifting in the currents of this dive site. During a dive, you may encounter sharks, such as grey reef sharks and white-tip reef sharks, often seen in this area.

 

·      Shark Airport, found on the North Atoll, is one of the best places for spotting a variety of marine life. Endangered sea turtles can be seen here, along with white-tip reef sharks and plenty of different corals. This relatively shallow site is also popular for night dives, during which you may get the chance to see eels, different types of pufferfish, and other nocturnal creatures. 

 

·      Black Rock is a dive site found on the South Atoll. You can follow the steep wall and see what marine life you encounter, but this site is not really known for its corals. Instead, you can wait for the sharks, particularly the white-tip reef sharks, to come out, as well as manta rays and the huge Napoleon wrasses. 

 

·      Washing Machine is named for the unpredictable currents which sometimes change direction in the middle of a dive, the Washing Machine is located at the exposed northeastern edge of Tubbataha. Known for having some of the best visibility of any dive site within the Marine Park, this dive site is home to grey reef sharks and an amazing diversity of tropical coral reef fish.

 

·      Bird Island is a very popular site that is also located on the North Atoll. There is something for everyone here, from crevices and swim-throughs to explore, as well as a steep wall with overhangs that may be home to a variety of marine animals.  Strong currents occur in certain spots, so beginner scuba divers may want to only stay in certain areas of the site or avoid it altogether. An advanced open water certificate is usually required for this site. The reef is home to a variety of different types of colorful corals, and you will more than likely find a tranquil shark resting on the sandy bottom of this breathtaking site. Eels and rays are also common here. If you get lucky, you may even see a giant ray swimming by.

Siladen Resort & Spa - Indonesia - CV-19

News from Siladen Resort & Spa - Indonesia

* * * Inon Underwater Photography Workshop with Lisa Collins * * *

March 5-13, 2021


It has been a while since we last shared information about Siladen Resort & Spa,  and we thought it was about time to let everyone know what’s going on. It has been over six months since we waved goodbye to the last guests to stay with us, and we are yearning for the day that we can wait on the beach for the first guests to arrive back.  
Dive Travel Awards
On behalf of all the Siladen Family we would like to say Terima kasih banyak — thank you very much!
Your nominations made the resort eligible for the 2020 Dive Travel Awards! Between a staggering 1100 dive resorts, your nominations got us in the Top 25! This is already a great achievement, but the resort is asking for your help one more time and let's see if we can win this thing! Thanks to all of your votes, the resort came in first place in 2017 and 2018, and came a close second in 2019, and we hope we have done enough to pick up the gold medal once again! Being named best dive resort in the world is as prestigious an award as it sounds, and it would mean even more considering how difficult this year has been. 
You can vote here, and the polls are open until the end of October. 

Inon Underwater Photography Workshop with Lisa Collins
Lisa will be giving hands on teaching, presentations, personal feedback and help with photo editing in this 8 night workshop, from 5th to 13th March 2021.
 
During the week Lisa will be teaching a range of subjects from creative macro techniques, flash positioning to avoid backscatter, creative lighting for wide angle and shooting the sun.
 
Siladen and Bunaken are the perfect locations to help you improve your underwater photography – with the professionalism of the PADI 5 star dive centre set up for underwater photographers, the vast amount of dive sites and subjects available in Bunaken for underwater photography, all set against one of the most beautiful and luxurious resorts in Indonesia, first place award winners year after year for best Dive Resort.

Jungle Bay Resort & Spa - Dominica, West Indies

Jungle Bay Resort - Dominica

* * * DEMA SPECIAL * * * 

Now Re-opened in June 2019

Our favourite resort on the "Nature Island" of Dominica was destroyed in 2017 by Hurricane Maria. The resort has now been relocated from the east side of the island to a location on the west side of the island near Soufriere village of Morne Acouma overlooking a marine reserve. The resort has 24 eco-villas in the first phase of reconstruction along with a restaurant, reception, yoga studios, meeting rooms, pool, and recreation center. The new location places the resort closer to the harbor and easier access for scuba divers.

We have a great DEMA Dive Show Special for Jungle Bay. Pack you dive gear and grab a flight to Dominicawith connections typically through San Juan, Puerto Rico. Other routes are available through Caribbean airports.

Contact us for an amazing adventure on Dominica and spectacular diving..!

Cozumel Closes Marine Park Southern Portion

* * * Cozumel Closes Marine Park Southern Portion * * *

The southern part of Cozumel Marine Park will be closed beginning October 7 until at least January, seriously limiting where dive boats can go. If you’re thinking about a trip to Cozumel, you may wish to reconsider. If you already have plans, you may wish to contact your dive operator to see how the closures will affect your diving.

The Marine Park includes the southwest quadrant of the island’s coast. The harder-to-reach northern and eastern sites will still be open, but, because of strong currents, only experienced divers prepared to make what can be lengthy and arduous boat journeys in rough water should consider diving these sites. These include the sites from El Mirador on the more exposed east coast, to Baja de Molas at the most northerly point.

The areas where most diving in Cozumel occurs -- from Palancar Gardens (on Cozumel’s southwest quadrant) to Maracaibo, and Playa Bosh in the extreme south (including dive sites Columbia, Punta Sur, and El Cielo) will be closed so government scientists may investigate the causes of ‘white syndrome’ affecting hard corals there and gauge the amounts and effects of pollution discharged by the large hotels that border the marine park.

Local dive operators say popular sites that can still be accessed by dive boats include Barracuda Reef on the extreme northwest coast, the wreck of the C-52, Tormentos Reef, San Francisco Reef, Santa Rosa, El Cedral, and Punta Delila on the west coast.

White syndrome starts with the coral showing well-defined areas of whitening, which then expand and, apparently spread to all other coral colonies by contact, mainly through divers touching infected coral during dives. Otherwise known as stony coral tissue loss disease, it’s affecting reefs in Florida too.

Global Climate Strike - Friday, September 20, 2019

Global Climate Strike

Friday, September 20, 2019

At Liquid Diving Adventures, our business depends upon clean water, healthy oceans, healthy coral reefs. We support marine clean-up campaigns, ending the use of plastics, and other initiatives to protect that which is 70% of our planet...the Oceans.

Alongside more than 700 businesses and organisations, we have pledged to be part of the This is Not Business as Usual movement to add our voice to the collective call for urgent action.

Will you be striking with us?

For the past year, the youth climate movement has been quietly growing in coffee shops in midwestern suburbs, libraries in urban centers, and classrooms in the rural south. Young people are preparing for a revolution to save our future, and on Friday, September 20, we invite you to join us. 
On that day, three days before the UN Climate Summit in New York, young people and adults all over the world will strike to demand that our leaders take transformative action to address the climate crisis; the strike includes some 500 events in the US alone. Across the globe, a coalition of hundreds of groups have been working over the last few months in hopes of making September 20 the largest climate mobilization in world history — and to create momentum that will launch us into a new era of climate action to save our futures.

Turks & Caicos VIDEO - Caribbean Explorer II

Our dive buddies Yan Grossman, his brother Bruno, and their friend Rick James Chatas were on an April 2015 charter aboard the Explorer Ventures Caribbean Explorer II to the Turks & Caicos. Here is a short video of some dive highlights.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tL9gyV6LAtA&vq=hd1080

 

Book a trip with us on this great charter…!

Previous Posts